Using Market Metrics to Spot Trends and Opportunities

Markets are always in motion.

Population, economic growth, demographics … these factors and more affect the supply and demand for every property you own.

Without understanding market metrics, investing is like reaching into a lake and hoping you pull out a fish.

But WITH market metrics … the savvy investor can spot trends and opportunities … and bag a winning catch!

Listen in as we explore how to make market metrics work for you.

In this episode of The Real Estate Guys™ show, hear from:

  • Your metric-master host, Robert Helms
  • His laugh-master co-host, Russell Gray

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Crystal balls aren’t real, but market metrics are

Every market is different.

Every city … every neighborhood … even every street has unique attributes of real estate.

When we look at real estate, we’re dealing with many different kinds of markets … niche markets, geographic markets, and demographic markets.

Real estate isn’t a typical asset class. Every deal is unique.

You can choose to throw a dart at the map and buy a property … or you can study market metrics and identify trends.

Most of the information readily available to investors isn’t local … it’s national or state data.

As an investor, you need to learn to take that higher-level data, look at both sides of the equation, and break down what it means for you.

We don’t have a magical crystal ball … but we do know that we can spot important trends if we pay attention to key metrics … and so can you!

Deciphering national statistics

Let’s start by talking about days a property stays on the market.

The National Association of Realtors recently announced that residential properties remained on the market for an average of 36 days in March 2019 … which was down from 44 days in February 2019.

What does this mean for the newbie real estate investor trying to figure out if this is a seller’s market or a buyer’s market?

This is the perfect example of national statistics that give a false impression when you focus on the market at a local level.

Someone in the Bay Area may think that 30 days on the market is forever … but to someone else from Kansas, that seems like selling in record speed!

Remember to dig deeper and look at both sides of the equation. Think about what other factors could be creating this metric.

Imagine that fewer people were listing their homes … that would mean that there were fewer houses available.

If there are fewer houses available but the same number of buyers … then the number of days spent on the market is going to go down.

On the other hand, if there are more sellers than buyers … then homes are going to spend more time on the market.

Three crucial metrics for real estate

Depending on the information you’re after, you pay need to attention to different metrics.

To get a good amount of information, you need a big statistical set.

That’s why most of the data that you read is going to be relating to a bigger group of properties than really affects your market and your property every day.

News pundits often talk about average home price and median home price. These are two different things with very different meanings.

If you have a list of 101 sales that happened last month, the sale in the middle of the list … number 51 … is the median price.

So, if you have the numbers two, five, and seven … the median is five.

And if you have the numbers two, five, and fourteen … the median is STILL five. Median price is NOT the same as the average price.

Another important metric to understand is net in migration.

People are always moving in and moving out of markets. Net in migration means a market where more people are entering than leaving.

More people means more demand for schools, services, shopping, and … housing!

It may seem like a rudimentary concept … but it is essential. If people are leaving a market, demand goes down and so do prices.

Dallas, Texas, is the perfect example of putting a market with net in migration to work for investors.

After the 2008 financial crisis, investors were forced to look at markets differently … and up until this time, Dallas had been boring.

The market had the least appreciation of markets on our radar … but after 2008, stability started to look really, really good.

Dallas had a winning combination of affordability, low income tax, vibrant infrastructure, and diverse economy.

The energy sector was a huge player … and it was one of the few industries that remained solid after 2008. As people moved in for jobs, demand grew.

Now, a decade later, we look at the net in migration, and Dallas has an additional one million residents since we first started looking into the market.

Look to the future

Some of these concepts may seem basic … but in real estate, it’s easy to fall asleep at the wheel. Real estate really does move slowly.

But when you see the headlines, you may feel like the wind is changing fast … and you need to act or be swept away.

Don’t panic. You have time to get in position, study a market, and build relationships.

Keep your focus on the basics … supply, demand, and capacity to pay. Every metric impacts these basic principles of real estate investing.

We can all look at the past and act on what we learn here in the present … but we need to look forward too.

As investors, we ultimately have to take our best educated guess. Market metrics give us the information we need to do our due diligence and act in the best way we know how.


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Appraisals – Find, Negotiate and Fund Better Deals

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder … and in real estate, an appraisal is what gives you the unbiased, third party opinion on a property.

Appraisals happen whenever a lender is involved in a transaction, but that’s not the only time you’ll need or want an appraisal.

We’ll examine the three ways appraisers can evaluate a property, why you shouldn’t accept an appraisal as gospel truth, and how you can use an appraisal to SAVE money on your next deal

In this episode of The Real Estate Guys™ show you’ll hear from:

  • Your valuable host, Robert Helms
  • His admiring co-host, Russell Gray

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Understand what an appraisal is

Nearly everyone who has purchased a property has dealt with an appraiser. In most all cases involving a lender, an appraiser is involved.

A lender is one of several parties interested in the value of a property. The seller, buyer, and lender all have an interest in knowing about value for different reasons.

But, an appraiser has no vested interest in a property’s value, making them the neutral third party. However, even though they are neutral, it’s good to keep in mind that their appraisal is an opinion of value.

While lenders are often interested in an appraisal to check out the value of the home versus the loan, it’s a FANTASTIC tool for investors, too.

Appraisers can determine the value of a property based on future use. Depending on what improvements or changes an investor plans to make, the value of a property changes.

So, why would you need to understand valuation?

  • To secure a loan
  • To evaluate a deal
  • To understand your portfolio’s value

An appraisal doesn’t only happen when evaluating or completing a real estate deal. It’s a way to understand your portfolio and properties at any point along the way.

Decode the jargon

An appraisal has a very specific purpose. Its job is to solve a problem: what is the highest and best use for this? That’s the challenge.

Appraisers in many countries use the same methods and standards to solve this problem. The Appraisal Standards Board (ASB) develops, interprets, and amends the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP).

The appraisal report is created using a combination of three methods:

  1. Sales comparison method. Look at similar properties and what they’ve sold for recently.
  2. Capitalization approach (income approach). This is the value the property based on the income it generates. What are people renting for right now? Where else could they go locally? In some cases, there aren’t many comps to look at, so the income a property is currently generating might be more appropriate.
  3. Summation approach (Cost segregation approach). Look at the income from the property and ask: What would it cost today for the land, construction, and development? This is a way to appraise a large, one-off or unique building.

The appraisers job is to look at the value based on these approaches and to weigh them properly.

How to use an appraisal report

Since appraisal reports are a third-party opinion of value, they aren’t set in stone, and shouldn’t be taken as the gospel truth.

Once you know what goes into an appraisal report, you can think critically about them and extract the parts that are useful.

And, it can be a valuable tool for negotiation.

In some cases, if an appraisal comes back LOWER than the offered price, it’s appropriate to go to the seller and start with that valuation in the negotiations.

Or, if you’re planning to go in on a deal with someone else and need to split the property value later, an appraisal is that neutral party that provides the numbers.

As with any expert, appraisers have a WEALTH of knowledge, and it’s worth learning a little about their craft. Some appraisers have some impressive niches, including airports, commercial buildings, and even haunted properties!

If possible, try to be on-site for an appraisal and learn what the appraiser is looking for. All of this information feeds into your education and foundation on how to improve properties to get the best bang for your buck … especially in a refinance or a sale.

Appraisals are a valuable tool for an investor. Whenever possible, be sure to spend the money on an experienced, well-respected appraiser. Then, when you get your report, understand the value AND the limitations of a report as you make your important investment decisions!


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The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training and resources to help real estate investors succeed.

The Changing Role of the Real Estate Agent

Are real estate agents obsolete?

These days, you can search listings and tour houses entirely through internet platforms. You can also list and sell properties using mobile phone apps.

It’s safe to say our processes for buying and selling properties have completely changed with technological innovation.

In this new landscape, however, real estate investors need real estate professionals on their side … now more than ever.

In this episode of The Real Estate Guys™ show, we’ll explain why the most CRUCIAL relationship you’ll ever have as a real estate investor is with your real estate agent.

You’ll hear from:

  • Your sprightly host, Robert Helms
  • His ancient co-host, Russell Gray
  • Eight-decade investor and broker, Bob Helms

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What is the role of the real estate agent?

First a definition … when we say real estate agent, broker, or professional, we’re referring in general to a person representing you, for a fee, in the purchase or sale of a property.

The role of the real estate agent has really evolved over the past several decades. In the past, only real estate agents had access to listings … but now, anyone with internet access can look up property prices on Zillow.

Although the WAY real estate agents function has changed, the core job of a real estate agent hasn’t changed at all. Real estate agents exist to represent YOU.

Their three main roles:

  1. Representative. Agents represent clients as a third party, at arm’s length. Someone who is not emotionally or financially attached to a deal can usually negotiate a better number.
  2. Fiduciary expert. It is the agent’s duty to hold clients to the highest legal level possible.
  3. Counselor. Agents are experts in empathy and adding value. They provide access to key individuals through their networks and can give you valuable information about the neighborhood you’re investing in.

Agents provide value by interjecting the available information with their accumulated wisdom and connections.

And if you really think about it … how much time can you spend developing negotiation skills for a deal you’ll only do four or five times in your lifetime?

Real estate professionals do the same transaction four or five times … every WEEK. They’ve built up skills and knowledge and have their thumbs on the pulse of the real estate world.

Negotiation is a learned skill

Negotiation is critical to good deals.

It’s even more critical when a deal starts to go sideways.

When a loan doesn’t come through or your financing falls apart, you have to get creative. But how can you get creative with no experience?

And just as importantly, how can you successfully navigate an emotionally negative event?

There’s a real art form to negotiating a win-win deal, and often the best option for a successful negotiation is having a professional do it for you.

A skilled professional can play a neutral role, win the trust of both the buyer and the seller, and figure out deal breakers and makers for both parties.

Critically, an agent doesn’t just broker sales. They’re your advocate. It’s their job to work with both sides … but get you a leg up.

A skilled salesperson can help people get over buyers’ remorse and help them implement the decision they have already made. And that could be the difference between a deal and no deal.

A win-win outcome IS possible … when you’ve got a professional who can suss out the objectives of each party involved in the deal.

A broker IS worth it

We weren’t surprised when we read new research from Collateral Analytics that shows properties sold by agents net a higher final price than homes sold by owners.

In fact, homes for sale by owners receive 5.5 percent less than those sold with the help of agents.

Some of you may be thinking, “What about agent fees?”

If agent fees are approximately equivalent or even slightly more than the difference between the sale price you would have gotten with them and the price you would have gotten without them … then you’re netting a similar deal for SIGNIFICANTLY less time and effort on your part.

Part of being a real estate investor is getting yourself into what we call deal flow … giving up tasks, delegating, and forming networks so the best deals flow straight to YOU.

Delegating tasks to a broker can actually MAKE you money, if your resulting deal flow gets you access to better deals.

It’s extremely important to understand that your business as a professional real estate investor is building a network of people who will feed you money, deals, and information … and have your back when you need support.

And you find people who’ll have your back … by having theirs. That means supporting your agent.

We’re big believers in building relationships to infiltrate a market. Find a way to form two-way relationships. Make other happy so they’ll want to make you happy too!

Don’t go at it on your own

So, what’s changed? One of the biggest changes these days is that brokers do less research.

It’s less about the data agents have at their fingertips … and more about the wisdom they can offer you.

Real estate agents and brokers play the same game they did decades ago. It’s all about negotiation and selling skills.

One more pro to having an agent on your side … professional brokers have both errors and omissions insurance AND a legal team.

They know where landmines are and can help you navigate new and unfamiliar markets without making a legal misstep … or spending a ton of money on a real estate attorney.

If there’s anything you get from this episode, we hope you realize it doesn’t pay to be penny wise and pound foolish.

The best professionals won’t cost you money … they’ll make you money. So, don’t be afraid to pay for the services you need.

And once you find a trustworthy professional, get everything you can from them. Build a relationship. Seek their advice. Eventually, YOU’LL be the one they start bringing unlisted deals to.

Kudos to all the real estate professionals out there.

Don’t have an agent yet? Consider this your challenge to get out there and find one!


More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training and resources to help real estate investors succeed.

Halloween Horror Stories 2017

Halloween may be yesterday’s news, but we’ve collected a killer bunch of horror stories that will give you a good spook … no matter what time of year it is.

In this annual segment, we’ll share seven tales of real estate investing gone horribly wrong … and the lessons investors took away from their nightmarish experiences.

This blog post features four of the stories … to hear the full collection, including stories about downed trailer parks, burning buildings, and more, listen to our podcast episode!

In our 2017 edition of Halloween Horror Stories you’ll hear from:

  • Your far-from-frightening host, Robert Helms
  • His co-host, an all-around scary guy, Russell Gray
  • Formidable five-decade investor, Bob Helms
  • Our formerly frightened guests

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Drugs, guns, and squatters

Peter and Monique bought a property … only to find out it was quite a nightmare. The pair bought a C-class apartment building about a year ago.

“The issue was not the fire, or the landscaper that was shot, or the gun that was pulled on the on-site manager, or the homeless people who set up in one of the empty apartments for Valentine’s Day,” says Peter. “No, the problem was even worse than that … it was the property management company.”

Peter and Monique thought they did their due diligence.

Their property management company, which the last property owner had also used, was the biggest and best in the state.

But the numbers started telling a different story.

Still, when Peter and Monique spoke to the people at the property management company, they were pleasant and reassuring.

The numbers kept sliding … for eight months, until the couple finally decided to hire a new property management company.

The pair discovered after the fact that the former management company had been negligent on all fronts. Although the company had a set of policies and standards that looked great on paper, they hadn’t been following them.

The property managers were not screening tenants, paying important bills, or handling maintenance issues. Some leaks hadn’t been fixed for MONTHS.

One of the most difficult parts of the situation was saying goodbye to the former company, who Monique and Peter had been friendly with and liked personally.

But today, Monique and Peter have contracted with a smaller boutique property management company that an investor acquaintance recommended to them.

They have weekly check-ins with the property management company, which has been staying on top of issues, so far.

Lesson: Don’t trust a property management company just because someone else trusts them. Do your due diligence … and then let the numbers inform your decisions. And always keep tabs on your property manager with regular check-ins and in-person visits.

The money pit

Felicia is a doctor and frequent traveler. She’s also a real estate investor.

She’s a busy lady. So, when her real estate agent found a great deal on a portfolio of eight homes while Felicia was out of town, Felicia didn’t hesitate to say yes.

Four properties were in good condition and already had tenants, while the other four were fixer-uppers. Not a problem … Felicia figured she could use the profits from the first four homes to fix up the second set of four.

The fixer-uppers were in C- and D-class neighborhoods, and Felicia discovered that her attempts at repairs were constantly thwarted … because every time her contractors left equipment and materials outside, they were stolen.

She was sinking money into the properties at a horrifying rate. Finally, Felicia asked how much it would cost to do all the repairs.

She got a $50,000 loan from her bank and used it to complete the repairs … only to discover that her 50k was gone and the buildings still weren’t ready for tenants.

At that point, she had to decide whether to keep digging herself into an even deeper hole. She decided to sell.

Felicia says if she could have done it differently, she would have made sure her investing partner was on board before proceeding with the deal. She found out after the fact that her partner hadn’t even made on-site visits while she was out of town.

She also would have had a general contractor or inspector go through the fixer-uppers and give her a quote and a time frame for repairs.

And finally, she would’ve made sure she was well capitalized so she could finance the repairs.

Lessons: Do your due diligence before purchasing a property. Understand your partner and make sure they’re all in. And if you do get into a bad situation, make sure you have the awareness to know when to stop.

The chilling chop saw massacre

Michael M. was driving by his property one day when he saw something truly horrifying … his tenant had fired up a chop saw and cut a ragged hole into the brick wall of his building.

An apartment on top and mini-market on the bottom, the property didn’t have any big problems … until one hot day when the mini-market tenant to put in an air-conditioning unit themselves.

Michael said he did a few things when he found out.

He was tempted to be offended that his tenant had permanently altered the building … so his first order of business was to get over his initial shock and anger.

Next, he talked to the tenant. He collected the tenant’s hefty security deposit and made it very clear that any unapproved alterations would be cause for removal.

Then, he hired some professionals to fix up the hack job done by his tenant. The tenant paid the bill.

Lesson: Make sure tenants are aware of the provisions of their lease and the consequences for violating those provisions. And make sure you’re covered by collecting security deposits from tenants.

A killer of a deal

BJ and Pauline’s problem started with their quest for a 1031 tax-deferred exchange.

The couple wanted to use the equity in their four-plex to buy a larger multi-unit apartment building.

They found the perfect property … or so they thought. It was a 12-unit building that fit all their criteria.

While doing their due diligence, however, the couple hired an inspector and began to realize the building would take a lot of work to get up to par.

All right, they thought … we can handle that.

Then BJ decided to do a few walkthroughs himself, without the real estate agent. On one visit, he ran into the maintenance man and got the real story about the building.

Apparently, the current property manager had recently been murdered in one of the building’s units. No one had disclosed that detail to the duo!

That manager had been involved in some “extracurricular activities,” says BJ, and most of the current tenants were there because they’d been connected to the manager’s illegal side job.

Despite their chilling discovery, BJ and Pauline didn’t throw in the towel. Instead, they used the building’s problems to their advantage.

They started by negotiating a rock-bottom price with the owner based on the information they’d discovered.

After purchasing the property, they got started on renovations and hired a new property manager. Their new manager had all the current tenants complete an application and sign a lease … so most of the former tenants moved out.

Although cash flow wasn’t great for a few months, the pair now have 7 out of their 12 apartments filled with vetted tenants. They’re hopeful for the future.

Lessons: Always visit and inspect properties yourself before purchasing. Get someone on the inside to give you the real scoop about the property and area. And at every point in the process, make sure you have a good team in place, including a quality lawyer and a diligent property manager.

Don’t get scared off …

We hope you’re not too scared. The goal of these stories is to encourage, not discourage.

Hopefully this year’s horror stories illustrate that real estate has ups and downs … and that nothing is wrong with you if something goes wrong with a deal.

We also hope you learn vicariously from these lessons and develop strategies for mitigating risk in your own investments.

End up with a horror story of your own? Like our guests, we want you to be able to shift from thinking “Oh no!” to asking, “What can I learn from this?”

Push yourself to fail faster, get better, and always keep learning.


More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training and resources to help real estate investors succeed.

Real Life Lessons – Raising Capital to Fund Bigger Deals

Periodically, we like to bring you stories of real-life investors … investors who’ve been in your shoes and made it up rocky paths to emerge better than they started!

The investors on our show today all fell into real estate investing in different ways, but one thing brings them together … they all attended our Secrets of Successful Syndication event … and then turned their education into effective action by becoming successful syndicators!

We asked each guest to tell us more about how they got started, what happened when they ran out of money, and some of the setbacks and successes they’ve each experienced.

Behind the mics for this edition of Real Life Lessons:

  • Your psyched-about-syndication host, Robert Helms
  • His seriously silly co-host, Russell Gray
  • Engineer turned syndicator, Sep Bekam
  • The deal hunter, Peter Halm
  • Self-storage empress, Linda Murray

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Why syndicate?

At some point, every real estate investor reaches a crucial moment where they have, for all intents and purposes, run out of money.

At that point, investors have two paths … they can take the path of least resistance and simply give up … OR they can harness their expertise and provide investment opportunities to other investors through syndication.

Syndication is a more effective version of “no money down.”

The truth is, there’s a ton of money floating around out there if only you have the right value proposition.

Syndication offers you the opportunity to build a big business with cash flow, long-term gains, and profit sharing … and all you have to do is find and broker decent investments.

You have the chance to create your own perfect life. Ask yourself … What do I want to get good at? What do I like to do?

Then focus on building specialized skills. You can’t be an expert in everything.

Syndication is like assembling a puzzle … you might only be a small piece of the whole (albeit a crucial one).

All of our guests today have taken the leap of faith into the world of syndication … let’s take a look at their stories!

From fear to freedom

If you met Sep B. years ago, before he started investing, it might be hard to make the connection between the shy, analytical engineer of yesteryear to the full-time syndicator of today.

When Sep started out, he had invested his personal money in two fourplexes in his own state. He had no business background and lots of fear about the unknowns of investing out of state.

“I was very motivated but didn’t know where to start,” says Sep. But Sep knew he had no money of his own left … and his family and friends were starving for yields.

So what did he do? It’s simple. Sep constantly looked for deals.

Six months after his first Secrets of Successful Syndication seminar, Sep closed on his first syndication deal.

Some of Sep’s major takeaways from his syndication experience:

  • Match potential investors with their needs and wants. Sep found investors were more likely to come to him when he emphasized his team, put strong systems in place to protect capital, and crucially, matched investors and investments appropriately.
  • Always be okay asking questions and learning from others. “It takes a certain level of curiosity to ask questions even if everything isn’t going right,” said Sep.
  • Find ways to mitigate obstacles. Sep and his team ask everyone they work with a series of questions to preemptively make sure companies and investors are the right fit for Sep’s syndication business.
  • Make small, controlled mistakes and learn from them. New syndicators will experience challenges along with success … and Sep’s certainly had his share of missteps. These days, he’s constantly fine-tuning, making sure he is adapting to changes, working with the right team, and offering the right product to tenants and a reliable source of passive income to investors.
  • Transition gradually from part time to full time. Before transitioning, understand how much passive income you need, Sep advises. Then break your goals into actionable, realistic steps.

From house flipper to deal hunter

Peter H. started out flipping out houses in Los Angeles. It was slow, hard work … paychecks only materialized when houses were sold, and prices in LA started skyrocketing, making deals hard and hard to find.

In January 2016, Peter attended Secrets of Successful Syndication. A year and a half later, he’s on his fourth syndication deal.

Some lessons he’s learned along the way:

  • Don’t tie yourself to one particular asset class. Peter’s deals have ranged from a mobile home park to multi-family apartments and currently to workforce housing. “If we discover a natural demand, we’ll jump in,” says Peter.
  • Align yourself with people who have great experience and access to funds. When Peter started doing deals that were big enough to be uncomfortable, he made sure he put himself out there and recruited people who knew what they were doing. “Everything was an interview process,” Peter said. “We asked a ton of questions.”
  • To build a network of prospective investors, listen to investor needs. By listening to people and discovering their wants, needs, and worries, Peter can file away what he’s learned until he finds a deal that fits a potential investor’s philosophy. It’s a win-win situation.
  • Syndication is not for everybody. “If syndication were really easy, everyone would do it,” noted Peter. If you are determined, want to work with people, and are willing to listen, syndication might be the path for you.

What is Peter’s philosophy? Treat everyone as a partner. “We’re all in this together, and we’re working toward a common goal of everyone wins,” said Peter.

From housewife to self-storage pro

Linda H. got her start in investing the hard way … when she realized she and her husband didn’t have enough IRA savings to sustain themselves during retirement.

She attempted to solve the problem by starting and then selling a business, but unfortunately, the business crashed before the deal could go through.

At that point, she switched to real estate, where she figured she could have more control.

She bought a fourplex, then a farm, then an apartment building. Then she ran out of money.

Listening to podcasts while she drove to each job site, Linda realized she didn’t necessarily have to go through the banking system … she could syndicate.

The transition from investor to syndicator was an uphill battle, Linda says. “It took a while to figure things out.”

Starting out as an inexperienced housewife, Linda had to wing it … but with some hard work, eventually her efforts paid off.

Today she just closed on two properties, has 850 self-storage units, and is currently working on building units at another site.

Her insights:

  • Find the right partners. Linda started out as a lone wolf, but after attending a seminar on self-storage, she met some people who gelled with her personality and they pooled their money.
  • Complementary skillsets can enhance your business. Linda had trouble raising money herself, but was skilled at the business side of syndication. Her partners were better at raising funds. Each person was able to focus on their own strengths.
  • People want what you have to offer. Linda noted that a lot of average people think the only option for investing is the stock market, which doesn’t offer a high degree of control. People are looking for options but don’t have the time to manage an investment … and as a syndicator, you can provide an answer, she says.

Making a REAL difference with real estate. One of our guiding philosophies is that “everything we do matters if it makes a difference in the life of real folks.” We think it should be one of yours, too.

As an investor or a syndicator, one of your goals should be to make sure people are better off with you than without you.

Another maxim to stick by? We like the words of Dave Zook, who says, “You can be conventional or you can be wealthy. Pick one.”

If you’re a real estate investor … heck, if you’re listening to this show … you’re not normal. And that’s a good thing!

The world needs you. You have an opportunity to add value to other people’s lives, to fill holes left by bad stewards and uninspiring investment options.

Are you ready to take the leap from investor to syndicator? We highly recommend getting around smart, successful people.

One of the best ways to do that is to come to our Secrets of Successful Syndication seminar.

As Tony Robbins says, “Success leaves clues.” So get around people who are super successful … and pick up some clues about how to find more success yourself!

Be the captain of your own ship. And remember, this business isn’t just about making money … it’s about making a difference.


More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training and resources to help real estate investors succeed.