Ask The Guys – 401ks, Losing Properties, and Preparing for a Bust

That’s right. It’s another episode of our favorite topics from our favorites guests … YOU!

It’s time for another segment of Ask The Guys … and we’re ready to tackle the tough questions. 

We’re touching on 401ks, purging portfolios of problem properties, and how to prepare for what many believe is an inevitable bust. 

And … there’s more!

The best way to learn is from each other. 

Remember … we aren’t tax advisors or legal professionals. We give ideas and information … NOT advice. 

In this episode of The Real Estate Guys™ show, hear from:

  • Your succeed-or-bust host, Robert Helms
  • His bust-a-gut co-host, Russell Gray

Listen


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401k sitting idle

Our first question is from Lenedia in Forney, Texas. She says she has about $16,000 left in an old 401k plan that’s just sitting idle. 

She wants to invest this money in real estate or in another niche that would give her a profit within a year … but she wants to know our advice for a first time investor. 

Well, we don’t give advice … but we are happy to share ideas. 

The duration of the investment is always an important factor. When you’re looking for a return in a short period of time … it limits the things you can invest in. 

When you’re using retirement savings … there are some rules and some risks. 

The best thing you can do as a first time investor is get educated. Invest in investment. The good news is that it doesn’t cost that much. 

In this particular case, you’ll want to learn about 401k plans and how they dictate what you can invest in. 

Maybe you’re at a point in your life where it’s time to start taking distributions from retirement. In that case, you may make different choices about where you invest the money. 

One of the big advantages of retirement account investing is that it isn’t subject to the same taxation.

But again … the most important thing you can do is educate yourself on all the options before you make a decision. 

What to do with non-performing properties

Christopher in Anchorage, Alaska, started purchasing multi family real estate in 2013. Currently, he’s sitting on two unfinished, non-performing properties.

Christopher says he either needs to find a buyer that wants to finish the properties … or an investor willing to front the funds so they can be finished and flipped for a cash out. 

What have we seen in these types of situations?

The real essence of the question is, “How do you get rid of a property you don’t want?”

Anytime you’re looking at an investment decision, you’re looking at its current condition. Whatever it is … it’s worth something in its current state. 

That worth is your baseline. Then, you look at what the potential of the property is … and what it is going to take to bridge the gap between where it is and its potential. 

If you can bridge that gap and make a profit … it may be an opportunity … but it still might not be the opportunity for YOU. 

Have other investors in your life come and look at the property and the market and ask them what they think the opportunity may be. They may see an opportunity that you don’t … or they may want to take it on themselves. 

Either way, it’s time to take a look at how the properties got this way to begin with. Why did this project croak on your watch?

Use it as a learning opportunity … and if you decide to take on the project yourself, you’ll need to be able to explain what happened to other investors. 

When you take the property to market … you may just decide it is best to take a loss on it and move on. Nobody gets through this business clean. 

Extra billions and the bust 

Jason in Merrick, New York, wants to know if we see the recent creation of billions of dollars pumped into the banking system having an impact on real estate. 

In the U.S. and many other countries, there is what we would term quantitative easing … printing money and creating billions of dollars out of thin air. 

Of course, there are ramifications. And there are a couple of things to think about. 

Lots of this capital gets into the system, and it doesn’t get back out again. That’s how it stays contained. 

People have access to the capital through whatever means bid up the assets that are in demand. 

That being said, there’s a lot of motivation on a lot of people’s parts to prop up real estate … because bankers make loans against real estate.

If those loans go bad … if real estate prices drop … the voters that live in those homes get angry at politicians. 

Some politicians are very motivated … that’s why you see a lot of effort to create subsidized financings and easing lending guidelines. 

All that to say that historically, more money being pumped into the system is good for real estate in the long term. 

Sometimes, it does create major disruptions in the credit markets. When that happens, credit markets dry up like they did in 2008 … and that has a negative impact on real estate prices.  

But, if you’re a cash flow investor and you’re controlling your real estate with prudent cash flows and long term structured debt that isn’t going to be called … you can ride that wave out. 

If prices were to crash again, we think it would be fair to expect that the powers that be will do exactly what they did last time … funnel lots of money into real estate until they can re-inflate. 

So, there are a lot of maybes and what ifs … but generally, real estate is the winner when there is more money floating around in the system. 

More Ask The Guys

Listen to the full episode for more questions and answers. 

Have a real estate investing question? Let us know!  Your question could be featured in our next Ask The Guys episode.

More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training, and resources to help real estate investors succeed.


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Podcast: Ask The Guys – 401Ks, Losing Properties, and Preparing for a Bust

Yet another enthralling episode of Ask The Guys! Listen in as we tackle more great listener questions about 401ks, purging portfolios of problem properties, and how to prepare for what many believe is an inevitable bust.


More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training, and resources to help real estate investors succeed.


Love the show?  Tell the world!  When you promote the show, you help us attract more great guests for your listening pleasure!

Ask The Guys – Markets, Growth, Condos and Credibility

You’ve got questions. We’ve got answers. 

That’s right. It’s time for another segment of Ask The Guys … when we host our most favorite guest … YOU!

This time we’re tackling listener questions about choosing a great real estate market, building a bigger portfolio, whether or not an office condo makes sense, and creating a rock-solid reputation in the real estate business. 

And … there’s more!

We never tire of hearing what is on your mind. 

Remember … we aren’t tax advisors or legal professionals. We give ideas and information … NOT advice. 

In this episode of The Real Estate Guys™ show, hear from:

  • Your rock-solid host, Robert Helms
  • His rocking out co-host, Russell Gray 

Listen


Subscribe

Broadcasting since 1997 with over 300 episodes on iTunes!

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To office condo or not to office condo

Our first question comes from John in Houston, Texas. He’s considering purchasing an office condo for his investment management business. 

“I’ve been doing research, and I get mixed feedback about these being a good investment,” John says. 

Is purchasing an office condo really better than leasing if you plan to be in the space for over 10 years? 

It’s a great question. 

Let’s start with what an office condo is. Maybe it’s obvious, but just like you would own a condominium home, you would own a part of an office complex. 

It could be the third floor in the corner or it could be its own building. It really depends on the development and its structure. 

These types of properties appeal to landlords who want commercial tenants instead of residential. The incentive for a business owner is that for what they are paying in rent, they could be working toward owning a building. 

Office condos can be really great investments. 

The biggest consideration for owner users is that not everyone has part of their business plan dedicated to owning real estate. 

But one of the great things about owning the business and owning the real estate is that you can do those two things separately. 

Your business doesn’t have to own the building. If you own it instead, you have the flexibility of just selling the business but keeping the building to lease out or selling the building and staying as a tenant. 

It also provides some asset protection benefits and other flexibility in terms of taxes. 

At the end of the day, talk with your legal or tax professional and run the numbers. Figure out the cost of ownership and if it makes sense for you. 

Growing bigger, faster

Casiana in Battle Creek, Michigan, wants to know how to grow her portfolio fast. She currently owns four rental properties and is interested in syndication. 

The whole premise of syndication is being able to do more … faster. 

Every property only cash flows so much … and to get to a really great passive income could take a lot of houses. 

Syndication isn’t the only way to go … but it is the next step for many folks, because it allows you to use other people’s expertise, money, and resources. 

You can also take advantage of great networking and education events like our Annual Investor Summit at Sea™. Come prepared … reading books by the instructors beforehand is a great start. 

Remember … education for effective action.

The main message is don’t trade time for dollars. Put your money to work for you. 

Money doesn’t buy happiness … but money can help take the things that make you happy and bring more of them into your life. 

Making sense of markets

Alex in Poulsbo, Washington, is looking to buy a first investment property … but doesn’t know where to begin. Maybe markets outside Seattle?

Well, you can make money in Seattle … but Seattle is very expensive. It’s one of the more expensive places to try to buy in the U.S. 

You may find out that investing in your home market means the numbers don’t work out very well … and since you are thinking about other markets, you’ve probably figured that out already. 

For those of you that live and invest in the same market … good for you! There’s no reason to go outside your market if you live in a place where the numbers work. 

Market analysis starts with listening to the industry buzz … what markets other real estate folks are excited about. 

Then, you look at each market and the key market drivers … factors that create vitality, jobs, and the need … or want … for more tenants to be there. 

Then, you need to look at the market in terms of your personal investment philosophy. 

What are you trying to accomplish as an investor? And what are you willing to do and not willing to do to achieve those goals?

Once you’ve found a market … or three … that look good to you, get on the ground. 

Go see things in person, and work on building a team. Latch onto a great property manager. 

Find experts who know the area. They should know where the path of progress is, where demand is going, and where the good tenants are.

They will help you drill down to the neighborhood where you should look for property. 

Carefully building credibility

Mike in Buffalo, New York, wants to know how to build credibility in his brand new real estate investment company as a wholesaler or investor. 

Credibility takes time to build. It’s like a reputation. 

You have one reputation. It takes you years to build it … and the whole thing can topple down in a minute. 

So, you’ve got to be very strategic and careful about building your credibility. 

It starts with presentation … how you show up, look, walk, and talk. 

Then, look at who you associate with. Seek out experts in the industry who are top notch quality, and find ways to enter their circles. Offer your help. Ask them questions. Find mentors. 

And … of course … do great work. 

In the end, credibility takes time and consistency. 

More Ask The Guys

Listen to the full episode for more questions and answers. 

Have a real estate investing question? Let us know!  Your question could be featured in our next Ask The Guys episode.

More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training, and resources to help real estate investors succeed.


Love the show?  Tell the world!  When you promote the show, you help us attract more great guests for your listening pleasure!

Podcast: Ask The Guys – Markets, Growth, Condos and Credibility

A litany of listener questions about how to choose a great real estate market to invest in, how to build a bigger portfolio faster, whether or not an office condo makes sense, what it takes to create a rock-solid reputation in a relationship business, and more.

So listen in as The Real Estate Guys™ answer listener questions!


More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training, and resources to help real estate investors succeed.


Love the show?  Tell the world!  When you promote the show, you help us attract more great guests for your listening pleasure!

Ask The Guys – Syndication, Apartments, Gold and More

You’ve got questions. We’ve got answers. 

That’s right. It’s time for another segment of Ask The Guys … when we talk about trends, challenges, and investment opportunities. 

This time we’re tackling listener questions about syndicating single-family homes when to make the move to multi-family properties, the rising role of gold in the economy … and more!

Remember … we aren’t tax advisors or legal professionals. 

We give ideas and information … NOT advice. 

 In this episode of The Real Estate Guys™ show, hear from:

  • Your answer-filled host, Robert Helms
  • His questionable co-host, Russell Gray 

Listen

 


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What makes a good investment

Our first question comes from William in Maryville, Tennessee.

William recently purchased a single-family residence. He wants to know what the average difference should be between monthly rent and expenses to make it a good investment. 

The answer varies depending on your personal investment philosophy … but we can give a general idea based on what we see from other listeners. 

We start with what we call the gross rent multiplier … also known as the 1% rule. 

The idea is to look at whether or not a property can take in a gross rent 1% of its purchase price. 

So, if you purchase a house for $200,000, a house would need to take in $2,000 a month as its base rent. 

And this number doesn’t consider your operating costs. 

If your property isn’t bringing in 1%, you’re going to be tighter on cash flow. Making a little more than 1% is always better. 

But remember … cash flow is certainly important. But there are plenty of other ways to get money out of your investment. 

The big picture is that in single-family rental homes that the tenant pays down or pays off the mortgage. Over time, income goes up. 

You’re creating a portfolio of property that increases its asset value, and cash flow increases too. 

Even in the best-case scenario, single-family homes are making a couple hundred dollars a month. That’s why so many investors start in single-family and then move into bigger asset classes.

Going bigger and growing older

And that’s just what Lou in McKinleyville, California, wants to talk about … moving into those bigger asset classes. 

Lou is 56 years old, and he owns six multifamily property units. He wants to know if … at his age … it makes sense to purchase more. 

Age does play into your investment horizon. What you really have to think about is … what do you want your investment to do for you?

At age 56, we think Lou still has a lot of time left. 

Continue building your investment portfolio. Play into your personal investment philosophy. And when you’re ready to retire and are relatively comfortable, it’s ok to call it quits. 

There’s no need to do more if you feel like you’re done. Until then, keep up the good work!

The smaller side of syndication

Let’s talk a bit about syndication. Greg in Auckland, New Zealand, wants to know if you can use syndication to raise capital for deals in single-family homes. 

Syndication is simply aggregating capital to do a deal. It doesn’t have to be a bigger deal. 

Instead, think of syndication as the way to go bigger … faster. 

So, the short answer is … yes. You can absolutely syndicate a single-family home. 

But there is a threshold that makes sense for syndicators because there are some costs associated with doing the deal … especially on the legal side. 

A tiny deal may not make sense for syndication, because you’re going to burden the deal with a lot of costs. 

What you probably want to do is think about building a portfolio. Instead of just syndicating a single property … go buy a collection of them!

And don’t forget that syndication doesn’t only mean syndicating capital. You can also syndicate credit.

Remember, there’s not much point in syndicating if you want to play small. The whole goal of syndication is to go big. 

All the things that go into syndication get amortized over the size of the portfolio … so from a cost perspective, building a bigger portfolio is the way to go. 

The value of gold

Karen from Lehua, Hawaii, wants to know what we think the coming financial meltdown in the U.S. will look like … and why gold won’t lose its value when it happens. 

The reality is that the longer we go in a cycle, the closer we are to a downturn. 

Nobody really knows what this downturn will look like. It all depends on what the critical factor is that turns the economy down. 

The one thing we know for sure is that the concern for American right now should be making a bigger allocation toward gold. 

If you follow the news, you know that central banks recently bought more gold than any time since Nixon took the country off the gold standard and collapsed the dollar. 

That’s an indication that people are beginning to lose confidence in the dollar … and when people lose confidence in currency, we see inflation. 

So, in the short term, you’re going to need supplies … things you can barter with until a new medium of exchange is introduced. 

But, in the long term, you’ll need something that is universally accepted as currency. 

Why is gold valuable? Because the banks are stocking up on it. There’s always going to be a market for gold. 

More Ask The Guys

Listen to the full episode for more questions and answers. 

Have a real estate investing question? Let us know! Your question could be featured in our next Ask The Guys episode. 


More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training, and resources to help real estate investors succeed.


Love the show?  Tell the world!  When you promote the show, you help us attract more great guests for your listening pleasure!

Podcast: Ask The Guys – Syndication, Apartments, Gold and More

Another enlightening edition of Ask The Guys as we tackle listener questions about syndicating single-family homes, when and how to move up to multi-family, and the rising role of gold in the global economy … and more!

So tune in as The Real Estate Guys answer another collection of great questions from our fabulous listeners!


More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training, and resources to help real estate investors succeed.


Love the show?  Tell the world!  When you promote the show, you help us attract more great guests for your listening pleasure!

Ask The Guys – Getting Started, Analyzing Deals, and Understanding Cycles

One of the best parts of our job is hearing from our amazing audience … and in this week’s episode we have more great questions from all of you.

That’s right, it’s Ask The Guys!

We’re talking about getting started in real estate investing, analyzing deals, understanding how economic cycles affect real estate investing … and more.

Remember, we are not legal or tax professionals. We don’t give advice … just ideas. Join our quest to answer your questions!

In this episode of The Real Estate Guys™ show, hear from:

  • Your book-smart host, Robert Helms
  • His street-smart co-host, Russell Gray

Listen

 


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Getting started in real estate investing

Our first question comes from Daryl in Boonville, Missouri.

Daryl wants to know the best ways to get started investing in real estate.

Lots of folks find themselves interested in real estate investing … but they don’t really know where to start.

There are so many books, blogs, podcasts, and seminars on the subject. It can be a little overwhelming … yet the basics of real estate are pretty simple.

What’s the best way to get started? Well, it depends on what you have to start with, where you want to go, and what you want to do.

But generally speaking, real estate is done with debt.

The first place to start is to take an assessment of where you’re at in terms of debt. Begin work on preparing yourself to be an efficient, effective borrower.

Go meet with a mortgage professional. Find out what your credit score is as far as real estate is concerned, what your documentable income is, and what types of loan programs you would qualify for.

Figure out what you need to invest.

Typically you need credit, a down payment, and technical advisors … like a football coach, you need to build your team.

Next, think about what you’re trying to accomplish. Most people want to grow … so it really starts with education and understanding your borrowing power.

Education doesn’t have to cost you a lot of money … but it will take your time.

Set aside and budget your time to be serious about investing. Go to a seminar or class. Join a local real estate investment club. Read books about the type of real estate that you’re interested in.

A great way to get started if you don’t have a lot of capital is to offer to help someone who is busy doing the thing that YOU want to be doing.

A lot of folks who are successful in real estate investing have more money than time … you might have more time than money.

The opportunity to lend a hand in exchange for learning can be huge.

You might even consider your first deal as a partnership in some way. One of our favorite ways to partner is through real estate syndication.

Syndication simply means a lot of people putting their money and their time together to do something.

Make sure that the person … or people … you are partnering with honestly know what they are doing.

Analyzing and understanding deals

Chris in Sun Valley, California, wants to know how to better analyze and understand deals.

First of all, there’s no such thing as a bad question … except the one you don’t ask.

Everybody who is at the front of the line was once at the back of the line … everybody who owns real estate today started with their first property.

It’s true that analyzing deals is one of investing’s critical skill sets.

If you’re analyzing deals for income, you need to understand an income statement for a piece of property.

One way to do this is to look at other deals. They’ll come with pro formas. You’ll be able to look at the financials … and then go out and look at other real world deals.

You’ll learn by doing that research … and once you feel like you’ve got the fundamentals down and understand the basics of financial analysis, you can take things to the next level.

The other side of the coin is actually analyzing the market, analyzing the physical construction of the property, and analyzing the condition of the neighborhood.

Like so many things in real estate investing, if you can find somebody who is active in the space and learn by helping them … you’ll pick up a lot.

You can’t get really good at analyzing deals by reading textbooks and taking classes … you will also need hands on experience.

So, start with basic education … and then, find a mentor.

Learning about the economic cycle

Laura in Austin, Texas, is looking to learn more about how real estate plays into the economic cycle … and how it’s affected by ebbs and flows. She wants to know what resources and topics we can recommend.

First up is a book by our dear friend Peter Schiff called How an Economy Grows and Why It Crashes.

It’s a simple book that is done in a way that makes the economy easy for everyone to understand … but it is also super, super powerful.

It has taken us years to wrap our minds around this stuff. The reason we cover broader picture economics and not just real estate is that every real estate investor is first and foremost an investor.

We all swim in the economic sea of the financial system that we are blessed … or cursed … with. So, it is imperative that we understand it.

There is definitely a lot you can learn by listening to people who have different opinions.

The Summit at Seais a great place to do that. We get people who come in with so many different backgrounds and from many different niches and markets all over the world.

We also recommend studying the Federal Reserve and the bond markets … because that is where interest rates derive from.

Study demographics … because that dictates where the people are.

Then, understand the way CEOs think about business … and where they want to be and don’t want to be.

Taxes are another area you’ll want to learn about.

In the United States, we’ve now made real estate arguably the most tax advantaged investment anyone can make … which should attract even more money into real estate going forward.

Like any ecosystem, there are lots and lots of components … and you’re not going to master them all. But if you can understand the relationships between them, then you can get into conversations with the masters in each area.

There are lots of great books, podcasts, and conferences to expand your knowledge. Be sure to check out the resources available on our website. We particularly recommend a video series we did called “The Future of Money and Wealth.”

Brian Tracy says that if you read an hour a day in whatever area of interest you have, in 10 years you’ll become a nationally known expert.

We believe that’s true. It happened to us.

More Ask The Guys

Listen to the full episode for more questions and answers.

Have a real estate investing question? Let us know! Your question could be featured in our next Ask The Guys episode.


More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training, and resources to help real estate investors succeed.


Love the show?  Tell the world!  When you promote the show, you help us attract more great guests for your listening pleasure!

Podcast: Ask The Guys – Getting Started, Analyzing Deals, and Understanding Cycles

Lots more great questions from The Real Estate Guys™ audience!

In this episode we talk about getting started in real estate investing, analyzing deals, understanding how economic cycles affect real estate investing … and a whole lot more!


More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training, and resources to help real estate investors succeed.


Love the show?  Tell the world!  When you promote the show, you help us attract more great guests for your listening pleasure!

Ask the Guys – Long-Distance Landlording, Property Management and More

Welcome back to an all-new edition of Ask The Guys!

Today, we’ll be answering listener questions. So listen in for our best real estate tips and tricks!

A disclaimer … we are not tax advisors or legal professionals. In our Ask The Guys series, we give ideas and information … NOT advice.

In this episode of The Real Estate Guys™ show you’ll hear from:

  • Your tipster host, Robert Helms
  • His tricky co-host, Russell Gray

Listen

 


Subscribe

Broadcasting since 1997 with over 300 episodes on iTunes!

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How do I find a property management company?

This question comes from Lee, in Bay City, Michigan. He wants to know whether we have any advice for finding—and vetting—management companies.

He says he’s investing in his area, but the only management companies he can find are run by real estate agents on the side. He has a day job, and doesn’t have time to manage on his own … so he wants to find a reputable company that’s up for the task.

He also asks whether he should move out of his local area, since there aren’t many management companies.

We always say you should invest where the numbers make sense … but you also need to invest in places where you can find a great team.

In the long term, your property manager is the most important person on your team. So if there aren’t any great property management solutions where you live … perhaps it’s time to expand your geographic investing boundaries.

Start by refining your personal investment philosophy, then look for a market that both matches your goals and has the management companies to fill your needs.

You don’t want single-point failure. Make sure the company you choose aligns with your philosophy. Ask them, “Who supports you, and how?”

You want to make sure their compensation model is aligned with your best interests. In other words, when you earn money, they do too.

And choose your property management company BEFORE you buy your properties. They can be an excellent resource for finding properties and asset class types that will work well for both of you.

Remember, you can’t scale up without putting the right team in place. Getting a great property manager on your team helps you find the professional distance you need to run your business properly.

How do Section 8 rentals work?

Laura, from Naples, Florida, wants to know how Section 8 rentals work and how she can acquire affordable housing in her investment market.

First, a few things about Section 8. Section 8 is housing subsidized by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). But it’s administered by local public housing agencies, so it’s not always available and differs across the country.

Section 8 can be great because a portion of the rent is paid by the government. You basically have a guarantee you’ll get most of your rent on time, regularly.

But tenants in this housing can be a tough crowd … sometimes they don’t blend well with other, non-Section 8 tenants. For that reason, we like a property to be all Section 8 or none.

A great resource for learning about Section 8 is Mike McLean, who has published a book called the Section 8 Bible and has some great online resources, too.

Affordable housing can be a good place to be because of stagnant purchasing power … but make sure you’re playing close attention to the program from which funding comes.

And keep in mind … the devil is in the details. If you’re not managing the property yourself, make sure your property manager is well acquainted with Section 8.

Should I invest now, or later?

Casey, in Lehi, Utah, has been listening to the podcast, and now he has a pressing question.

Casey has saved up $100,000 to invest, but he wants to know whether he should invest now or wait until the market takes a dive. He mentions worries such as rising interest rates, an unstable dollar, and inflation.

Let’s start with a premise … markets will either do well or poorly in the future. We know that. We also know that when the market hits the bottom, you can only go up.

Real estate is a long-term, buy-and-hold business. But it is interest-rate sensitive, so you want to make sure you lock in long-term financing if you invest now.

It’s also good to keep some liquidity for if and when the market does go downhill.

Something we like to say is, “Opportunities are like busses. Another one will always come along … but you have to get on the bus at some point.”

The way we see it, Casey has a few options …

  1. Invest in things that are likely to do well, even when the market is bad, particularly mid-level rentals and below. There will always be demand for housing, especially mid-range housing.
  2. Invest in a forced equity situation … a neighborhood or property that has room for improvement, which you can force upward in value. This will help you mitigate downward pressure to the dollar.
  3. Invest in a bigger market … this provides stability, as these markets have more ballast during tough times.
  4. Step in on the debt side of the market by lending money to other investors.
  5. Work with an experienced syndicator who is more likely to get investments right, even when times are more precarious.

Remember, when you’re in property for the long haul, most of the time you’ll be fine. The key is to structure deals so you can weather the ups and downs.

Another thing to consider … the price only matters when you buy and when you sell. In between, it’s all about cashflow.

Real estate is one of the best inflation hedges if you structure the financing properly relative to cashflow … but you can’t fledge against inflation if you don’t do anything at all!

How do I create residual income with little savings?

Jeff, in Fountain Hills, Arizona, says he is in an interesting situation.

He doesn’t have any income, but he has enough cash to live on for 24 months. In the meantime, he wants to figure out how to create residual income that will pay for his living expenses going forward.

Jeff is looking at building a balance sheet of passive income sources.

But right now, he has time, labor, and energy he can put to work. And since he’s not holding on to a chunk of cash, the active investor route is a good one.

Some options …

  1. Force equity by fixing and flipping.
  2. Earn cashflow by fixing, holding, and renting.
  3. Become a syndicator and use other people’s money to make great investments. It’s our favorite way to go full-time, fast.
  4. Try wholesaling.

Basically, what Jeff needs to do right now is to build up his investment capital so he can start getting some cashflow.

But before he does that, we suggest he invest in education and build relationships. Get the right tools in your toolbox and the right advisors at your back before you go big.

Can you recommend turnkey management companies?

Keith hails from East Sandwich, Massachusetts. He recently bought a home through Mid South Homebuyers and is ready to buy another.

The problem? He’s on the waitlist at Mid South. In the meantime, he’s looking for another turnkey company that manages the houses it sells.

One disclaimer … we don’t know anybody quite like Terry Kerr at Mid South.

But we do know lots of other great folks.

The idea of a turnkey provider is that they do the whole thing … find the properties, get them in great shape, put tenants in, and manage the rentals.

But before you look for a provider, think about the type of property, market, and team you want.

Then go ahead and search our provider network for someone who can help fill your needs. We don’t guarantee anyone on the list, but we do promise we’ve spent a lot of time with them on the ground and have seen enough to trust them.

Should I attend Secrets of Successful Syndication now, or later?

Gene, in Boston, Massachusetts, is an investor who owns two duplexes. He wonders whether he should attend our signature Secrets of Successful Syndication conference now, or later in the year when he has more experience.

We’ve gotta say, we really think the key is for investors to come early and often.

This conference is designed for investors who already have a portfolio and are ready to take the next step.

But even if you’re just starting out, it’s a great way to get around what we call “evidence of success” and learn the power of networking.

Experience is something you can accumulate through other people. And syndication is all about having the experience to make good investment decisions.

So, for those who want to move forward, we recommend you start as soon as you can.


More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training, and resources to help real estate investors succeed.


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Ask The Guys – Cash Offers, Crappy Properties, and More

We’re back again to tackle the questions we missed in our last Ask The Guys episode. We love these episodes and the opportunity we get to talk through some of YOUR real-world investing opportunities and challenges.

We hear from listeners dealing with tenant damage and security deposits, 1031 tax-deferred exchanges, nontraditional lending ideas and TONS more.

First, the ground rules.

We talk about ideas and information. When you’re dealing with real money in the real world, you want to consult a professional. We don’t offer legal, investment, or tax advice.

In this episode of The Real Estate Guys™ show you’ll hear from:

  • Your problem-solving host, Robert Helms
  • His trouble-making co-host, Russell Gray

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Question: How soon can I move in after a cash offer, and how low can I go under the asking price?

Joseph in Tacoma, Washington, asked this question. The important concept to understand here is price versus terms.

Whether or not you offer cash or take out a loan, the outcome is essentially the same for the seller. What cash offers is a quicker payout with certainty.

But, this isn’t attractive to every seller. In some cases, a quick closing isn’t what a buyer wants at all, so the promise of quick cash won’t be an incentive.

When you’re negotiating with cash, make sure what you’re offering lines up with the seller’s priorities. A cash offer doesn’t automatically mean a 20 percent discount.

Question: I rehabbed a rental property in Detroit, and now I’m ready to sell. My tenant wants to purchase the property, but she has limited cash on hand. How can I find a lender to do the deal?

Wilbert in South Field, Michigan, brings us this question. He wants to sell the home for $38,000, but the appraisal came back at $20,000. That price gap, as well as the location has made it difficult to find a traditional lender.

The first problem is that many banks won’t do a loan for less than $50,000. If the lender is going to go to all the trouble to do the paperwork for a percentage of the loan amount, then the loan amount needs to be enough to get their attention.

Here are a couple alternatives for Wilbert to consider:

  • Find a private lender. This might mean a higher interest rate for the buyer. But, that higher interest rate will be more likely to attract a lender.
  • Be the private lender. Rather than finding an outside investor, work a deal with the tenant to have them pay the loan to you instead. If they pay off the mortgage, you’ve still had that steady stream of income. If not, you’ll get the property back to rent or sell to someone else.
  • Find a different buyer. If finding a private lender isn’t possible, consider finding a different buyer who is able to get financing or purchase the home for the price you want to sell.

Question: When a tenant in our out-of-state rental moved out, they caused a lot of damage. Why don’t tenants take care of their rentals better, and why are they surprised when they don’t get their deposit back?

Renters view their home differently than an owner. How else do you explain that it feels like no renter owns a vacuum cleaner?

Damage to property is part of doing business as a landlord. But, Lauren in Charleston, South Carolina, did a lot of things right. They documented all the damage with photos before the tenant moved out, had a third-party realtor do a final walkthrough with the tenant, and got estimates from contractors to repair the damage.

Here are a few other things you can do to deal with damage:

  • A picture is worth a thousand words. Take photos of the property BEFORE the new tenant moves in and get their initials on the photos. Then, when they’re ready to move out, you can use those photos to justify the cost of any damage.
  • Open up a pet policy. Many landlords are hesitant to allow pets in a rental. But, with a hefty pet deposit and even a little higher rent, you can come out on top.
  • Get a read on your renters. As you screen applicants, be perceptive. We’ve also known people who will meet with potential renters at their current residence to see how they treat their current space. This may not be possible for everyone, but get creative and thoughtful about how you screen new renters.

At the end of the day, renters are more likely to treat a rental home with less care than you do. Damage and repairs are a cost of doing business, so make sure you build that into your budget.

Question: I want to sell my rental home in California, and I’m interested in the 1031 tax-deferred exchange to buy a new property in Texas. I’m confused by the IRS form and want to know if this will eliminate my taxes in California?

Cindy in Fort Worth, Texas, is definitely an A student!

First of all, we want to be clear that with this kind of complicated tax question, you need expert opinion and advice. A 1031 tax exchange intermediary will be well worth the cost and can answer all your questions.

The intent of the 1031 tax-deferred exchange is that if you sell a property and then purchase another property, you can defer the tax. As you buy and sell properties, you can continue to defer the tax, but there isn’t a way to eliminate the tax completely.

Finally, try not to let the tax tail wag the investment dog.

Real estate offers many great tax benefits, which is one of the reasons we love it! But, when you’re dealing with real money and the IRS, you need a team of experts to guide you.

Life is short, and you don’t want to spend your valuable time reading an IRS form.

Question: How can I learn more and get coaching on real estate syndication?

Addie in Seattle, Washington, brings us a question that is near and dear to our hearts!

We recommend our Secrets of Successful Syndication seminar as your first step. Whether you want to be a syndicator and learn how to leverage money with a group of investors or invest passively in real estate, this is an event you’ll learn a lot from.

In this seminar, we’re teaching the strategies that have been a part of our investments for years.

We do have a coaching program, but you can only learn about it at the seminar during an OPTIONAL session after the two days are done.

If you want to register for the event and see if syndication is right for you, we’d love to have you!

Question: My wife and I have a real estate investment company with 23 doors under rent. We’ve found traditional lenders to be slow and cumbersome and want to simplify our lending process. How can we do this?

John and Karen in Troy, Ohio, are having trouble scaling their business because of lenders. They write that they’d be willing to pay a higher interest rate to make the process easier and more streamlined.

For traditional banks, the process is often necessarily slow. They need to do due diligence to make sure the investment is a good one.

Private capital is easier and faster, but it comes at a higher price. This can be done through syndication or networking to find interested investors. Make sure you’re well advised and working with big deals, and you’re well on your way.

We’d also suggest that with the rollback of some of the Dodd-Frank provisions, some of the restrictions on community lending have eased. If you haven’t checked in with your community lender recently, it’s worth getting to know them. They’ll get to know you and your entire portfolio of properties and could be a valuable resource.

Question: I wasn’t able to attend your events for the Future of Money and Wealth in Florida. But I’d sure love to get access to that information. How do I do that?

A listener in Hawaii wants to learn from the incredibly faculty we brought in to talk about how to keep up with the changing times in the economy.

This was a one-off event, and it was an incredible gathering of some of the best minds in a variety of subjects all focused on how to protect your wealth.

We recorded the event with a professional video crew and now have 20 different panel discussions and presentations available to watch.

You can visit the Future of Money and Wealth website to learn more or send us an email to future [at] realestateguysradio [dot] com. We’ll get you all the details on how to access these videos.

Question: My schedule seems to be always booked up by the time I hear about the Belize discover trips. Do you know the future trip dates for later in the year?

Tim in Silverton, Oregon, like many of us, has a busy schedule and needs to plan ahead!

To find out events as soon as possible and to get them on your calendar, get on our advanced notice list. Head to the events tab on our website. If you find an event there, and the date doesn’t work out, get on the advanced notice list and you’ll get an email letting you know about future dates.

Our next Belize discovery trip will be August 24-27, and registration is open now! We hope to see you there.

Question: What is the definition of a performing asset?

Matthew in Nacomin, Florida, asks us the shortest question in our inbox!

Simply put, a performing asset is something that puts money in your pocket. The more cash flow, the more equity. If you have something on your balance sheet that doesn’t put money in your pocket, it’s not a performing asset.

When you consider an asset you can go for a fat cow, a performing asset that will come at a premium but continue to deliver, or a skinny cow, a non-performing asset that needs some work to get it performing again.


More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training and resources to help real estate investors succeed.

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