Getting in the flow of money on the move …

Investors and their money are attracted to opportunities.  They purchase assets, including properties and businesses, in the pursuit of profits.

That’s probably why YOU are reading this.

It’s why we perpetually peruse the news … looking for clues about where investors, businesses, jobs and money might be going and growing.

After all, where people and prosperity are … demand and capacity to pay for real estate are too.

So when we saw this headline pop up in our feed, we decided to look past the political positioning and see if we could find opportunity …

Jobs Are Booming in Trump Country, But Pay Lags 

Bloomberg, 5/7/19 via Yahoo Finance

“ … the 2,622 mostly rural and exurban counties [Trump] won in the 2017 added jobs at twice the pace as they did under … Obama …”

“Red America overtook Blue America … in 12-month employment growth for the first time in seven years …”

Of course, the article is focused on the political ramifications … which is fine for raising your blood pressure or getting unfriended on Facebook.

But we really struggle with all that red and blue stuff.

When we look out the window from the airplane, we see mostly brown and green.  And when we talk to folks on the ground, it’s true there are different colors … but not blue or red.

Maybe we’re missing something.

In any case, we’re far more interested in discovering the investing opportunities of where “jobs are booming” and why … so we can get in on the action.

The Bloomberg article affirms a trend we’ve been commenting on for some time …

“… the changes are driven largely by a spread of growth to outlying areas typical of the late stages of an economic expansion and a bounce-back in energy production and manufacturing.”

In other words, when people get priced out of expensive areas because of a boom … they move to more affordable areas.

Meanwhile, the resurgences in energy and manufacturing are very important economic drivers to watch.

Energy has been a big jobs driver post-2008 … and continues to play an important role in the creation of domestic jobs.

Meanwhile, the rebirth of manufacturing is affecting some former boom towns whose fortunes fell as American manufacturing went offshore over the last two decades.

It’s no secret President Trump believes the U.S. must re-establish itself as a manufacturing powerhouse.  This makes sense for a guy who made his fortune building things.

What may be less obvious is how Trump hopes to achieve this fundamental transformation of the way America produces prosperity.  But there are clues.

We may or may not agree with Trump’s goals or methods.  But that’s not the point.  What matters is what he’s doing and the effect it’s having.

When we asked then-candidate Trump what a healthy housing market looks like in a Trump administration, he simply replied, “Jobs.”

Of course, back then it was just talk.  Now, just over two years on the job, headlines say …

U.S. creates 263,000 jobs in April as unemployment falls to 49-year lowMarketWatch, 5/3/19

Job openings in U.S. jump to 7.49 million — more proof of ultra-strong labor marketMarketWatch, 5/7/19

While there’s more to the story than we can delve into today, most observers agree those are pretty good numbers.

Of course, to get from interesting to actionable, we need to dig a little deeper …

Our good friend, world-class tax-strategist, CPA and best-selling author Tom Wheelwright wrote this in his recently updated book, Tax-Free Wealth

“ … tax laws … have evolved to become tools of social and economic policy making.”

But this isn’t a anything new …

Way back in 1946, then-Chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York gave a speech and made these shocking admissions …

… taxes … serve … to express public policy in the distribution of wealth and of income … subsidizing or … penalizing various industries and economic groups …

In other words, tax laws move money where the government wants it.

Right now, the tax laws tell us Donald Trump wants money moving to Main Street.

As Tom Wheelwright explains in his presentation at The Future of Money and Wealth, the new tax law makes real estate EXTREMELY attractive for investors.

In fact, many real estate syndicators are having success attracting investors who are just as eager for tax breaks as they are for the profit potential of the deal!

And now that the opportunity zones regulations are becoming more clear (watch for a follow-up radio show on this hot topic shortly) … it’s likely even MORE money will be moving from Wall Street to Main Street.

For a glimpse of what’s coming, we took a look at the Jobs Opening and Labor Turnover (JOLT) report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Here are some notable highlights … 

“The number of jobs openings increased for total private(+363,000) and was little changed for government.”

“ … largest increases in transportation, warehousing, utilities (+87,000) construction (+73,000), and real estate and rental and leasing (+57,000).”

No surprise there’s a lot of job-creating money going into distribution and related commercial real estate.

What remains to be seen is whether Trump’s tactics will trigger long-term sustainable domestic manufacturing … and the middle-class jobs that come with it.

There’s been some progress, but it takes a lot of capital to create the infrastructure to support serious manufacturing.

But just as the tax law helps attract billions into the shale oil production revolution …

… the Opportunity Zones tax incentives could pull billions into creating the real property infrastructure to rebuild atrophied manufacturing communities.

Money moving from Wall Street to Main Street.  We like it.  And it’s a trend alert real estate investors are watching carefully.

Until next time … good investing!


More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training, and resources to help real estate investors succeed.


Love the show?  Tell the world!  When you promote the show, you help us attract more great guests for your listening pleasure!

Opportunity Zones – Reduce Taxes by Investing in Main Street

It’s easy to figure out where tax incentives lie in wait. Just study the tax code.

The latest version of the tax code introduces a new tax shelter … opportunity zones. But … what are opportunity zones?

In this episode of The Real Estate Guys™ show, we dive into what we know about opportunity zones … including three MAJOR benefits.

You’ll hear from:

  • Your opportunistic host, Robert Helms
  • His inopportune co-host, Russell Gray

Listen

 


Subscribe

Broadcasting since 1997 with over 300 episodes on iTunes!

real estate podcast on itunesSubscribe on Androidyoutube_subscribe_button__2014__by_just_browsiing-d7qkda4

 

 


Review

When you give us a positive review on iTunes you help us continue to bring you high caliber guests and attract new listeners. It’s easy and takes just a minute! (Don’t know how? Follow these instructions).

Thanks!


Opportunity zones: The basics

There’s a way to pay no tax on certain investments AND heal struggling communities. We’re talking about opportunity zones.

These new geographic tax shelters are encoded in the version of the tax code passed in 2017 … but they’re not totally finalized yet.

That doesn’t mean they’re not important … savvy investors will be absorbing all the info they can BEFORE opportunity zones go into action.

The idea of opportunity zones is to offer a tax-favored investment vehicle for people who already have capital gains in other investments.

Opportunity zones will be located in low-income communities ripe for revitalization … and will be located in every state in the U.S.

The fundamental purpose of opportunity zones is to encourage long-term investments in struggling communities.

Congress has established an incentive framework that is flexible and unique. This is essentially a new class of investment.

These opportunity zones complement existing community development plans. In essence, the project is treating the U.S. like a giant rehab project.

You’ll basically be moving yourself into a pre-identified path of progress. There hasn’t been a ton of incentive for investors to come into these run-down, lower income areas. But NOW there is.

The benefits of opportunity zones

Like we said earlier, the idea of opportunity zones is set, but the legislation is not in action yet. The appropriate documentation and legislation will be in place by the end of 2018.

So NOW is your time to prepare for the future.

There are definite differences between this opportunity and other investments. Generally, you’re required to pay tax when you liquidate capital gains.

But investing in opportunity zones provides three unique tax benefits. Before we get into those, we do want to clarify … this investment is only available for investors who already have capital gains from previous investors.

But not to worry … if you’re a newer investor who doesn’t have any capital gains yet, there are ways to get in on the action. We’ll get into those in the next section.

Now, the three tax benefits …

  1. You can defer your original capital gains tax for up to 10 years. As you probably know, it’s always better to defer taxes than to pay now.
  2. You also get a 10 to 15 percent discount on your original capital gains tax.
  3. AND …when appreciated capital gains are put into an opportunity zone investment, the gains you make from that investment are completely tax free.

There is a timeline. You have to sell the appreciated assets and invest the capital gains into one or more opportunity zone investments within 180 days.

But we want to emphasize … your capital gains from properties in opportunity zone areas will be completely TAX FREE.

No capital gains? How to invest in opportunity zones

The government has a goal here … they want to bring a ton of investment capital to certain areas and swing them around.

In that vein, there is a certain requirement you have to follow to invest in opportunity zones … there is NO tax incentive if you own property in an opportunity zone under your own name.

You have to invest in opportunity zones through opportunity funds.

If you don’t have appreciated assets, you may be wondering how you can start an opportunity fund and get in on this great opportunity.

There are a few options …

  1. Invest in an area near an opportunity zone. You’ll be boosted up by the wave of capital increasing asset values all around you.
  2. Invest as a syndicator. Set up an opportunity fund … and get other investors to contribute their capital gains.

This last point is something to seriously consider … especially when you start thinking about the stock market.

The stock market is hot, but it’s showing signs of faltering. People want to take their capital gains out … but they don’t want to pay taxes.

A fantastic solution? Opportunity funds.

All about opportunity funds

What does it take to put together an opportunity fund?

Opportunity funds do not have investment limitations.

They must be organized as a corporation or a partnership.

They do not require official IRS approval … the fund manager can self-certify the fund simply by submitting a form to the IRS.

The process is designed for speed. It cuts out bureaucracy … and brings locally driven change to areas that need it.

But it also requires investors to make REAL change … for example, one requirement we expect to see is that investors put as much into rehab and construction as they spent to acquire the property.

Opportunity zones mean sending money to the bottom of the market … and making the subsequent changes LAST for the long term.

For a map of tagged and categorized opportunity zones, plus more information, simply send us an email at opportunityzones [at] realestateguysradio [dot] com.

And don’t think this is the last you’ll hear about opportunity zones … we expect this to be a BIG wave in the real estate investing sea, and we’ll be providing more information to our listeners as this new opportunity develops.


More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training, and resources to help real estate investors succeed.


Love the show?  Tell the world!  When you promote the show, you help us attract more great guests for your listening pleasure!

Halloween Horror Stories – 2018 Edition

Welcome to our annual edition of Halloween Horror Stories … real world accounts of real estate deals gone horribly wrong.

We’re honored our guests chose to share their horror stories with us. They also discuss what they discovered in the process … so YOU can learn what NOT to do.

In this Spooktacular episode of The Real Estate Guys™ show, you’ll hear from:

  • Your spooky host, Robert Helms
  • His spooked co-host, Russell Gray
  • Investors Sep Bekam
  • Todd Sulzinger
  • Michael Manthei
  • Brad and Emily Niebuhr
  • Silvana Shull
  • Lane Kawaoka
  • David Kafka
  • and Ryan Gibson

Listen

 


Subscribe

Broadcasting since 1997 with over 300 episodes on iTunes!

real estate podcast on itunesSubscribe on Androidyoutube_subscribe_button__2014__by_just_browsiing-d7qkda4

 

 


Review

When you give us a positive review on iTunes you help us continue to bring you high caliber guests and attract new listeners. It’s easy and takes just a minute! (Don’t know how? Follow these instructions).

Thanks!


The shot heard ‘round the neighborhood

Our first story comes from investor Sep Bekam. Sep bought a 36-house parcel and started making repairs and raising rents to market price.

But this made one particular tenant less than happy.

You see, the existing tenant was occupying two houses … one for personal use and one for their daycare business … and the rent raises meant they had to downsize.

But that’s life. Sep put a Section 8 tenant into the newly unoccupied property and thought that was that.

Six months later, he found out there had been a drive-by shooting. Turns out the Section 8 tenant had a teen involved in gang and drug activities … not the kind of thing you can find out on a background check.

The Section 8 tenant moved out shortly afterward, and Sep started the process of putting a third tenant in the house. But the old tenant … the daycare owner … still wasn’t happy. They started interfering with the leasing agents, trying to scare off prospective renters.

Still, Sep found a new tenant and everything seemed okay again … until about a month later, when the tenant heard loud shots.

Turns out the disgruntled neighbor had fired a paintball gun at the new tenant’s house … then told them about the previous drive-by shooting.

The solution … Sep made an agreement with the new tenants to put in a state-of-the-art security system so they would feel safe.

The takeaways … Crime sometimes happens, no matter how many safeguards you have in place. Sep says it’s important to mitigate the problem WHEN it happens so it’s not associated with the neighborhood.

And keep in mind, Sep has a portfolio of over 100 houses. He reminds investors to not get discouraged … these kinds of horror stories are the exception, not the rule.

The bankrupt builder

Todd Sulzinger started investing his self-directed IRA funds in 2011.

He found a developer building fourplexes who was looking for hard-money loans and decided to sign on.

A few months later, one of the developer’s major suppliers went bankrupt. And then … the developer went bankrupt too.

Because Todd was only in on a portion of the fourplex, he couldn’t foreclose.

The solution … Todd did his best to fight for the money held in the construction management company. Unfortunately, he never recovered all of his money, and what he did get back didn’t return until years later.

The takeaways … “Don’t do a hard-money loan on a fourplex,” Todd says. Know exactly where your money is going BEFORE you make a loan, and understand what will happen in a worst-case scenario.

Also, make sure you can foreclose on a property. And evaluate the risks of any loan or investments. If you’re unsure … ask questions. The vetting process should take time if you’re doing it right.

The mysterious doorman

Michael Manthei’s troubles didn’t start when he bought a 10-unit building in a rougher neighborhood … they started when he replaced one tenant with an older gentleman who seemed like a nice guy.

Soon after the tenant moved in, water started leaking from the apartment into the commercial space downstairs.

Then, there was a death in the apartment.

Turns out, the new tenant had been charging homeless people $10 to shower at his place. He let one woman stay overnight … and she overdosed and died. The man was even running a prostitution operation from the apartment.

The solution … “We kindly asked him to leave, and he complied,” Michael says. That wasn’t the end … the apartment was in bad shape and had to be gutted and cleaned.

The takeaways … Don’t trust your intuition more than the process.

Michael now makes sure new tenants complete an application, do a full criminal and eviction background check, and supply references and employment history before he will even consider them.

He considers that process an investment … on getting quality, long-term tenants.

The curious sucking sound

Brad and Emily Niebuhr do a lot of mixed-use deals. But in one property they bought a few years ago, things went terribly wrong.

First, there was the love triangle. One tenant had her boyfriend added to the lease … but a few months later, the boyfriend moved into the apartment of a DIFFERENT tenant.

But that’s not the horror story.

People started to hear lots of noise and banging … including odd sucking sounds … coming from the second tenant’s apartment. Then, water started to leak from the apartment into the commercial space below.

Turns out, the tenant and her new boyfriend had jaunted off to Alaska, but not before illegally subletting the apartment.

The subletter had an issue with the bathtub drain … but since he didn’t want anyone to know he was there, he was using a Shop Vac to drain water from the bathtub, sometimes as many as 13 times a day.

Even worse … the new subletter was allegedly a drug dealer who brought an unverified service dog onto the property.

The solution … Emily and Brad did a property inspection and gave the subletter notice, and he quickly moved out. They also fixed the drain issue.

The takeaways … If you couldn’t tell, Brad and Emily were managing the property without the help of a property management team. They told us that now, they wouldn’t go without one.

They also realized that investments are about more than the numbers. Even though the mixed-used property had amazing cap rates and returns, it was in a rural area, and they couldn’t find a property manager.

Although they finally have property management now, it took a lot of searching. “There’s a learning curve to the due diligence process,” the couple says.

When disaster strikes

In 2008, Silvana Shull had a successful business in Japan … a large retail furniture and interior design operation. She bought and designed a custom showroom because the numbers made sense.

But right after, the economy started to shift.

She was able to manage for about three years … until 2011 and 2012, when Japan was struck by a series of natural disasters, including tsunamis and earthquakes.

The operation was destroyed.

Silvana had to make a decision … cut her losses and try to rebuild, or close her business entirely and try to recover what she could.

The solution … Silvana sold the building she bought for less than 10 percent of what she originally paid. She shipped all her remaining inventory to Hawaii, where she eventually was able to sell everything … but the entire process took seven years of daily, dedicated effort. And she did it all while taking care of her two small children.

The takeaways … Running an international operation isn’t easy and requires a team. “I didn’t listen to advice and thought I could do anything,” Silvana says.

If she were to do it again, she would listen more and move slower. Although it’s impossible to control natural disasters, Silvana says it probably didn’t make sense to expand in Japan, considering she was living in Hawaii at the time.

The incredible shrinking IRA

Lane Kawaoka is a podcaster, like us. His show is called Simple Passive Cashflow.

He is also an investor who has made a few mistakes.

When he was starting out, Lane wanted to use his self-directed IRA to invest in a passive deal, but he didn’t know many people.

So, when he got a referral, he didn’t do much investigating. Lane invested $43,000 … almost his entire IRA fund … in a deal that looked pretty good on paper.

But then he started networking with other limited partners and heard the operator wasn’t the most scrupulous person. A year later, Lane got a letter that said his deal had gone south.

Lane was left with a property that needed $20,000 worth of repairs in a tertiary market with long selling times.

The solution … Lane wrote off the loss and eventually fire-sold the property. He was left with only $7,000 in his IRA fund.

The takeaways … “Don’t work with someone you don’t know, like, or trust. And don’t lose focus on building relationships with other peer investors,” Lane says.

Trouble in paradise

This story comes from an investor outside of the U.S. … David Kafka. David is located in Belize.

One day, David got a call from an employee. The police needed him to identify a body. Turns out, it was a client of David’s … he had just listed and sold her house.

There were some questions floating around about whether the client had actually wanted to sell, and David had the keys to her house. He was worried he might be a suspect. But he was even more worried about finding the actual killer.

The solution … Eventually, David ended up closing the deal. And he realized he wasn’t a detective and couldn’t solve the murder. He had to extricate himself.

The takeaways … Dot your I’s and cross your T’s, says David. When the unexpected happens, you want to put yourself in the best possible position.

Also, remember that sometimes bad things happen to good people … and that many things are simply out of our control. So, be compassionate and have fortitude, but keep your nose out of things that aren’t in your jurisdiction.

A red-hot deal

Our last horror story comes from investor Ryan Gibson.

Ryan invested in a condo-conversion development opportunity, converting an existing single-family home into condos.

He had great insurance … probably a little too much, he says. But that insurance came in handy when someone broke in and started a fire two months before the condos were set to be finished.

Ryan was on vacation in Hawaii when he got the call, but he had a local contractor on the ground who could help manage the situation.

The solution … Ryan immediately sent an email out to his investors. He also informed his lender, a bank, right away. And he submitted an insurance claim, which luckily covered the damage to the dollar.

The fire extended the entire process by about three months, but in the end, Ryan was able to offer his investors a return over 50 percent.

The takeaways … “If it can go wrong, it probably will,” says Ryan. So always be over-insured. And remember, “Bad news doesn’t get better with age.”

Be transparent and handle problems as quickly as possible … and make sure you have eyes and ears on the ground to help you out when times get tough.

How to handle a horror story

In stressful times, attitude plays a big role. But what really matters is asking the right questions:

  • What happened?
  • Why did it happen?
  • How can I resolve it?
  • What can I learn?

That way, you can turn your horror story into a learning experience that will help you be an even smarter investor.


More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training, and resources to help real estate investors succeed.


Love the show?  Tell the world!  When you promote the show, you help us attract more great guests for your listening pleasure!

The Future of Interest Rates and More with David Stockman

We love talking about real estate. But, real estate is only a part of the sea of our economic landscape. Rising interest rates have a HUGE impact on real estate and the economy in general.

That’s why we are talking to one of our favorite former Wall Street and Washington insiders.

He tells us his take on the future of interest rates and the economy … and shares how YOU can capitalize on changing interest rates to make smart real estate decisions.

In this episode of The Real Estate Guys™ show you’ll hear from:

  • Your swimming host, Robert Helms
  • His sinking co-host, Russell Gray
  • David Stockman, former U.S. Congressman and best-selling author

Listen

 


Subscribe

Broadcasting since 1997 with over 300 episodes on iTunes!

real estate podcast on itunesSubscribe on Androidyoutube_subscribe_button__2014__by_just_browsiing-d7qkda4

 

 


Review

When you give us a positive review on iTunes you help us continue to bring you high caliber guests and attract new listeners. It’s easy and takes just a minute! (Don’t know how? Follow these instructions).

Thanks!


The U.S. economy is a fantasyland

David Stockman is an expert not only in economic policy, but also in articulating and explaining complex topics in a way anyone can understand.

David’s political path began in college when he worked for a congressman and learned what it took to be a policymaker. He won an election to congress after the incumbent in his district retired.

Later, he was drafted to be a part of Ronald Reagan’s economic team. President Reagan appointed David as budget director, where he helped launch economic policies.

When it comes to economic policy, there are generally two schools of thought … Keynesian and Austrian.

“Keynesianism says basically that you can’t rely on capitalism to grow; you need the helping hand of the government,” David says. “We say get out of the way! The less government the better.”

And of course, limit borrowing and spending.

The other major factor in economics is interest rates … which directly affect home buyers and investors.

“Rising interest rates have historically told Congress to get its fiscal house in order,” David says. “It elicits a reaction in the country that says, ‘You’re crowding out investment that we need in the private sector.’”

But money printing and distortion of the capital market can cause major crashes like the one we endured in 2008. The subprime disaster SHOULD have been a wake-up call to the country.

In the 94 days after the crash, the Fed increased the balance sheet by 150 percent more than in the previous 94 years.

David says that put us on the path of crazy money printing and low interest rates … and has fueled more speculation.

Now, the Fed is trying to stabilize interest rates and has put the economy in a precarious position.

And there’s an important concept for today’s investors to keep in mind as they evaluate the economy … the recency bias.

“If you’re looking just at what happened yesterday or last year, you might lose track of the fact that we’re in fantasyland, and fantasyland is a dangerous place to be,” David says.

Essentially, the Fed realizes that they went way too far for way too long, and that they won’t be ready for the next big crisis. And the deficit continues to grow out of control.

Which means the next crash could be even bigger.

David says that for investors who are borrowing large sums of money to finance their investments, there’s no more dangerous time than right now.

He calls for prudent underwriting today, and keeping an eye toward the future.

Higher interest rates and lower property values are the types of problems that can erase yields.

“Debt can produce wonderful returns,” David says. “But, if you get caught blindsided, it can be a very dangerous thing to wrestle with.”

Shore up investments before the crash

While many pundits are talking about how robust the economy is, it’s important to listen to the people who are sounding the alarm. So, what can happen?

“If we have another crisis, innocent people will be hurt,” David says. People who lost in the dotcom bust and the housing crisis will have similar and possibly even bigger losses.

This time, the fed will not be in the position to bail out the system. And David says that perhaps in the next crash, the Federal Reserve will emerge as the real culprits of economic instability.

One of the big lessons is to stay educated and understand the fundamentals. You can turn a crisis into an opportunity.

What should a prudent investor be doing now to prepare for the next downturn?

“I think that the idea of cash-flow oriented investment is a sound one,” David says, “but the underwriting going forward will have to be more discriminating and careful than ever before.”

This is especially true for commercial investing. It’s important to ensure that tenants can continue to pay their leases.

Above all, David says that being a careful and prudent investor is a more secure place to be.

For investors who didn’t live through 2008 … or even if you did … you can learn from David’s expertise.

Want to learn more from David and keep up with his advice and takes on the economy? Send an email to Stockman [at] realestateguysradio [dot] com.


More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training, and resources to help real estate investors succeed.


Love the show?  Tell the world!  When you promote the show, you help us attract more great guests for your listening pleasure!

Building Your Network and Credibility by Attracting the Right People

Real estate investing is a social endeavor. The more people you know … and the better those people are … the more likely you are to succeed.

But how do you turn your business relationship dreams into reality?

The secret to building relationships is alignment.

In other words, YOU have to bring value to the table to build strong relationships … and you want to seek out people who can bring value to you, too.

In this episode of The Real Estate Guys™ show, we’ll talk with a powerful connector who is an expert at helping folks nurture and build relationships.

You’ll hear from:

  • Your connected host, Robert Helms
  • His cantankerous co-host, Russell Gray
  • Kyle Wilson, promoter and brand builder

Listen

 


Subscribe

Broadcasting since 1997 with over 300 episodes on iTunes!

real estate podcast on itunesSubscribe on Androidyoutube_subscribe_button__2014__by_just_browsiing-d7qkda4

 

 


Review

When you give us a positive review on iTunes you help us continue to bring you high caliber guests and attract new listeners. It’s easy and takes just a minute! (Don’t know how? Follow these instructions).

Thanks!


The three ingredients of strong relationships

Kyle Wilson has had the chance to work with a lot of great people throughout his career. Recently, he wrote a book about the lessons he has learned from them.

One of Kyle’s mentors and partners was entrepreneur Jim Rohn, who died in 2009. Jim said, “Success takes time, and the twin killers of success are impatience and greed.”

Today’s society wants instant success, says Kyle … but it takes time to do anything worthwhile, including building your network.

That doesn’t mean every relationship you spend time on will be great. A second lesson Kyle learned comes from Zig Ziglar, who said, “Never do a good deal with a bad guy.” It’ll never work out for the best.

We’ve got the first two ingredients … time and good people. The third ingredient of a successful relationship is value.

You need to BE a good partner before you can HAVE a good partner … and that means bringing value to the table. Solid relationships aren’t usually based on people just being nice to each other … they’re about value.

A good relationship or partnership should be win-win on both sides.

Dream big … and put in the time

Kyle shared another lesson from his book, 52 Lessons, with us. (Pssst … to read the book, simply click here for free instant access. Kyle is publishing the book entirely online, one chapter a week.)

He learned this lesson from Mark Victor Hansen, founder of the well-known Chicken Soup for the Soul book series.

Mark told Kyle, “We’re going to sell 100 million books.” Kyle didn’t believe him.

Today, the Chicken Soup for the Soul franchise has sold more than 600 million books.

Kyle calls the lesson he learned “stretching the rubber band” … Mark forced Kyle to think beyond what he thought was possible.

It’s essential to build relationships with people who can get you outside of your comfort zone and help you dream big.

To turn your dreams to reality, however, requires dedication, a lesson Kyle learned early in his career from success expert Bryan Tracy.

Bryan said, “Success is like getting a plane off the ground.” It takes a ton of fuel and energy to get that plane from the runway to the air … but once you’re at 300,000 feet, you can coast a little.

Kyle applied that wisdom to the beginning of his career. He spent the first two or three years putting in the hours … so he could reap the results later.

Most people spend their whole lives going 80 miles per hour down the runway and never breaking free from gravity. “That’s not efficient,” Kyle says.

Great relationships will propel you upwards

52 Lessons is a compilation of stories from individuals who’ve been through a defining experience and made the changes necessary to bounce them to success.

Kyle can share a similar story … he sold 7 million books as a publisher, then sold all his companies and retired in 2007 to become Mr. Mom. He even signed a non-compete.

Several years later, he wanted to get back in the game … so he used the knowledge he’d amassed to start a new publishing business. His first book was Passionistas, a book about millennial women hustling to make their businesses succeed.

Kyle says he’s able to leverage his experiences and relationships to create more success for himself and others around him. That’s one reason he loves attending our annual Summit at Sea™.

The Summit isn’t just about information, Kyle says … it’s about the people you meet and the relationships you build.

At some point, most investors will want to move from solo investments to syndication with other people. That’s where our Secrets of Successful Syndication seminar comes into play.

Most people attending that event already have half a dozen properties … and almost everyone has something they can offer to other investors.

It’s a way to put yourself in a target-rich environment.

Leverage social media

Kyle says that for the modern entrepreneur, online relationships are important too. “Whatever business you’re in, it’s all about building an audience.”

Whether that’s through a podcast, social media, an email list, events, or a combination, online networking might be your secret sauce to building a network.

Kyle says that for him, “It’s counterproductive to pay someone to do social media … it’s about the pulse.”

But whatever strategy you alight on, you have to be authentic about it. You can delegate the minutiae … but you should be the architect of your connection strategies.

And EVERY strategy you make should begin with the philosophy of bringing value to others.

Align yourself with others

As The Guys, we’ve built a successful brand and a network full of investing rockstars because we work to find common values.

If you’re looking to make connections, DON’T jump into a partnership right away.

Instead, do a deep dive to determine your own personal mission, vision, and values. Then you can determine whether others will help you advance your goals … and whether YOU can help THEM.

Not everyone you meet will offer that kind of win-win relationship.

If you’re looking for help figuring out your mission, vision, and values, come to our Create Your Future goal-setting retreat.

Discover the big picture of who you are as a person … and learn what you want, how (and how not) you can get it, and how to evaluate potential relationships.

Convert your passion … into action. And attract the right people into your life by removing uncertainty about what YOU want.


More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training, and resources to help real estate investors succeed.


Love the show?  Tell the world!  When you promote the show, you help us attract more great guests for your listening pleasure!

Finding Opportunity in Comeback Markets

Job creation is up. Even better news … the jobs being created are blue-collar jobs, many in the reviving manufacturing industry.

This means more wages, more workers … and more folks who can pay rent.

In this episode of The Real Estate Guys™ show, we talk to an entrepreneur who has built a real estate business in an off-the-radar market.

The truth is, the hot markets you always hear about … San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles … don’t make sense for investors.

On the other hand, markets with not-so-great reputations might get you the best bang for your buck, depending on where they’re at in the market cycle.

Our conversation today delves into what makes a market make sense … and what it takes to make a profit in sensible markets.

Listen in … you’ll hear from:

  • Your reputable host, Robert Helms
  • His bad-reputation co-host, Russell Gray
  • Bryce Keesee, founder of Great Lakes Capital Solutions

Listen

 


Subscribe

Broadcasting since 1997 with over 300 episodes on iTunes!

real estate podcast on itunesSubscribe on Androidyoutube_subscribe_button__2014__by_just_browsiing-d7qkda4

 

 


Review

When you give us a positive review on iTunes you help us continue to bring you high caliber guests and attract new listeners. It’s easy and takes just a minute! (Don’t know how? Follow these instructions).

Thanks!


Riding the market waves

Let’s start with a quick real estate investing lesson.

Many people generalize the entire real estate investment category. They think real estate is overheated … so there’s no opportunity anywhere, for anyone.

That’s just plain wrong.

Real estate is NOT an asset class. It’s NOT a market. It’s an investment category with MANY different markets, each of which is in its own unique place in the market cycle.

But smart investors don’t look at averages. They take the time to do research, look for clues, kick the dirt, and meet people in individual markets.

When you’re looking for great markets, one excellent option is the comeback market.

Markets go through phases …

  1. Growth.
  2. Stabilization.
  3. Deterioration.
  4. Revitalization.

Catching a market as it hits step four is the key to riding an up-wave.

You don’t want to get in before things have started looking up … but you do want to get into markets that are turning upwards before the crowd.

Case study: Cleveland

Our guest Bryce Keesee got into real estate in southern Florida 15 years ago … but he has since switched to a market in the midst of MAJOR revitalization.

The market? His hometown … Cleveland, Ohio.

You might not initially think of Cleveland as a great investment market. That’s part of what makes it so great.

Bryce says the market offers many benefits … good price points for properties and rents, a steady flow of dependable tenants, stable worker incomes, and best of all … high cash flow.

Let’s get into what makes Cleveland so great.

First of all, a revitalized manufacturing industry only adds to the wide variety of blue-collar companies in the city.

Steel manufacturers join other major employers like Lincoln Electric, Progressive Insurance, several Amazon warehouses, and the renowned Cleveland Clinic, just to name a few.

This variety offers stability … and provides blue-collar jobs that keep rent prices steady.

These jobs are one reason Cleveland has a reputation for affordability.

Bryce is a fan of blue-collar workers because they tend to be long-term tenants. Many of these workers don’t plan to buy a home. Purchasing a property is “off the list” of goals for many people.

Dive into the details

We asked Bryce to give us the low-down on his typical rental property.

Bryce says properties are slightly different depending on location.

The east side of Cleveland has been abandoned for many years, although it’s starting to see growth now. So price points are a bit lower.

Bryce says single-family homes on the east side sell for $60-65,000. Monthly cashflow is $750 a month, on average … well above one percent.

The west side, on the other hand, has slightly higher price points and rents. Homes sell for 70-75,000, and rents are in the $900 range.

It takes 30-60 days from closing to repair and refurbish properties so they’re ready to rent.

The rehab process doesn’t follow a cookie-cutter template. Bryce and his partners have standardized the contractors and materials used, but each property gets an individual evaluation.

He wants well-functioning, desirable rentals that will save the company time and maintenance costs in the long-term.

That keeps tenants happy. Bryce also works to keep tenants happy by building relationships with tenants via his property management company.

“Our tenants love us,” Bryce says. A big reason is great communication from his property management team, with whom he has a 10-year relationship.

What about the general atmosphere of the Cleveland market? Ohio is extremely landlord-friendly, says Bryce. The law allows for a 3-day notice to vacate for non-paying tenants. The eviction process is only 10 days.

That doesn’t mean Bryce follows those timelines … he says his response is to establish a relationship with tenants and make sure the lines of communication are open. Yet another reason why property management is so important!

Investors interested in the Cleveland market should listen in to get access to a special report by Bryce that includes even more details!

Ohio Field Trip

Bryce really loves Ohio, and he thinks other investors will too.

Cleveland has great sports teams and the second-largest performing arts district outside of New York City.

But it’s also experiencing a revitalization that you can only really understand by kicking the dirt.

That’s why we recommend the Cleveland Field Trip.

You’ll get a chance to tour Cleveland with Bryce. But you’ll also learn about the investment model Bryce uses … an excellent education even if Cleveland isn’t right for you.

We live in an era of over-saturated markets. It’s hard to find markets that make sense. But some markets are just starting to get hot.

The very best way to get in on these markets is to learn from someone who has boots on the ground. Because remember, you’re not looking for a property, or even just a market … you’re looking for a TEAM.

And a field trip is the best way to meet the people … who know the market … and can help YOU build your own brilliant team.


More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training, and resources to help real estate investors succeed.


Love the show?  Tell the world!  When you promote the show, you help us attract more great guests for your listening pleasure!

MANY lessons from Amazon’s HQ2 search …

You’ve probably noticed Amazon is taking over the world.  There’s a lot we could say, but we’ll narrow our focus to lessons for real estate investors …

In the May Housing News Report, there’s an article about Amazon’s ongoing search for their second headquarters (HQ2).

Even from just a real estate perspective, Amazon is a fascinating company to watch.  There are SO many lessons to be gleaned from watching what they’re doing … and how the world is reacting.

In case you’re new to the Amazon HQ2 story …

In 2017, Amazon put out a Request for Proposal (RFP) to bait cities across the U.S. into falling all over themselves to win Amazon’s coveted second headquarters …

… and the 50,000 high-paying jobs (average salary = $100,000 per year) that come with it.  We commented on this story at the time.

At first, there were hundreds of cities in the hunt. We said at the time we think there’s an excellent chance Amazon will pick Atlanta.

Early in 2018, the race narrowed to 20 finalists … and Atlanta’s still on the list.

Which brings us to now …

In the Housing News Report article, there’s a link to an analysis by Daren Blomquist of Attom Data Solutions.  Daren ranked the 20 finalists by comparing the cities on certain criteria defined in Amazon’s original RFP.

It’s the same process we did, except Daren used actual data … we just guessed.

Here’s Daren’s actual chart for your viewing pleasure …

Notice Atlanta’s ranked #2.  So our hunch is holding its own … so far.

Meanwhile, there several useful things to glean from this chart and the story behind it, so let’s dig in …

Single family homes are NOT an asset class

We’ve said it a thousand times, but just look at the median prices.  They range from $130,000 in Indianapolis to $1.445 MILLION in New York.

When people say, “Housing is in a bubble!” … what housing are they talking about?  Indy?  Seems pretty cheap based on median price and affordability.

And when high-priced markets start hitting the top of their affordability range, people MOVE … to more affordable markets.  People ALWAYS need a place to live.

So while it’s true that migration patterns drive prices … demand rises or falls as people move in or out … it’s often economics that drive migration patterns.

So an alert investor can get in front of growing demand and ride a wave up. That’s exactly what the folks who got into Dallas five years ago have done.

Equity happens … but not evenly

Look at the disparity in five-year appreciation rates among these markets … from just 8% in Montgomery County to 246% in Dallas.  HUGE difference!

Even in markets where median prices are similar … say Dallas and Miami… the five-year appreciation variance is substantial … Dallas coming in at 246% and Miami at “only” 71%.

So price doesn’t seem to be the deciding factor for appreciation.

And neither does property tax … as Dallas is second highest behind New Jersey (hey, New Jersey had to win at something), but Dallas is still king of appreciation.

Meanwhile Denver has the lowest property tax … half of Atlanta … yet their appreciation rates were about the same.

And price-to-income ratios don’t seem to make the difference either … as Los Angeles and New York are both equally unaffordable, yet New York has half the appreciation.

Keep it simple …

Obviously, this is just one chart … and it’s easy to get lost in the weeds.  We don’t want paralysis from analysis.  So charts like these are just the start of a deeper dive.

But it doesn’t have to be complicated.  Here’s what we look for …

What do winners have in common?

Dallas and Austin are both triple-digit appreciators … even though Dallas grew at twice the rate of Austin.  Is it just simply they’re both in Texas or is there more to the story?

Of course, 10 years ago, Dallas was coming off being one of the slowest appreciating markets in the country.  So something changed that dramatically…

What’s driving appreciation?

Prices get bid up when supply is growing more slowly than demand with capacity to pay.

So though you can see affordability based on income on this chart, you can’t see supply and demand drivers.  Neither can you see the economic drivers.

But you need to look at them.

That’s why we say you can’t study 20 markets well.  It’s too much.  Use a chart like this to pick your top three … and get to know them very well.

What markets are poised for growth?

Once you understand what makes a market like Dallas tick … and how it went from no growth to explosive growth … you can watch for similar factors in sleepy markets.

When you spot something interesting, you go in for a closer look.  If things go your way, you get there before the masses … and you get to catch a rising star!

What are the big players doing?

Big players can do research you can’t.  But that’s okay because you can piggy-back on their hard work.  It’s like cheating off the smart kid in school, except you don’t get detention.

Amazon is a juggernaut in American business … and their power is impacting real estate of all kinds … retail, industrial, and even office and housing in markets where they have a footprint.

That’s why SO much attention is being paid to their search for HQ2.

But another reason to watch is they’re leaders in business decision making too.  Other employers are watching what Amazon does and being influenced by it.

So when Amazon ultimately picks a city, we’re guessing other companies will cheat off their homework … and pick the same city.

The reason we bet on Atlanta is because many other Fortune 1000 companies had already chosen Atlanta as a great place to set up shop.

We don’t know what process they went through to get there.  We just know they did.  So as Amazon goes through its process … they may reach similar conclusions.

Of course, Raleigh is also home to a comparable number of big companies.

But based on the world-class airport, huge labor pool, access to higher education, major distribution, and a business-friendly environment … though it’s close, we still think Atlanta has the edge.

Then again, Jeff Bezos isn’t consulting with us, so we’ll just have to wait and see like everyone else.

Meanwhile, as the field narrows, we’ll continue to learn where corporate leaders think the best location is for their businesses, employees, and new job creation.

Until next time … good investing!


More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training, and resources to help real estate investors succeed.

Equity happens …

We’re taking a break from our relentless preparation for the upcoming Future of Money and Wealth conference to focus on one our favorite subjects …

Equity.

According to a recent report by CoreLogic, last year’s increase in America’s home equity wealth was the largest in four years.

In 2017, the national CoreLogic Home Price Index rose by more than six percent, the largest annual increase since 2013.

We call this “passive equity” because the market just handed it to homeowners simply for buying and holding their property over that time.

Good job.

Of course, national averages are interesting, but not useful for practical investing.  Real estate is local right down to the neighborhood and property … and no two are exactly the same.

Think of it this way …

If you have one foot in a bucket of snow at 20 degrees and another in a bucket of 170 degree steaming hot water, on average you’re enjoying a nice soak in a warm bath …

… but in the real world, you’re scalding one foot while you get frostbite on the other.  National averages have limited utility.

Fortunately, CoreLogic provides a nifty color-coded map which compares equity growth at the state level:

 

 

Unsurprisingly, coastal states with strong technology business … California and Washington … lead the pack for equity growth.

But we’re guessing closer analysis would show equity rich markets are expensive relative to rents, so income investors can’t just go to dark green and buy.

So how’s an investor to use this kind of data?

Here are some ideas for your consideration …

First, you can do a deeper dive into the states with strong equity growth, and look for common factors.  Right away, we saw coastal and tech.

But that’s just a start.

Look at supply and demand, nominal and real incomes, job growth, population growth, and migration patterns.

Then talk to street level people who live and work in those markets.  Find out what they’re seeing right now.

Once you have your mind around what makes equity happen in one market, you can look for similar conditions in other “emerging” markets.

Then (hopefully) you can make your move and get in early … while the rent ratios still make sense … and ride a wave up.

Of course, if you’re a typical busy person with a small portfolio, that’s a lot of work relative to the size of the investment … especially if you plan to travel to check out markets, build teams, and inspect properties.

Plus, you might not even like doing all that, even if you had the time and a big enough portfolio to justify it.

That’s why we’re HUGE fans of syndication.

Syndication is where a syndicator aggregates funds from a group of investors through a private placement, and then does all the busy work of running the deal … for a fee and a piece of the action.

As long as there’s enough profit in the deals to split equitably, it’s a win-win.

The “passive” investors win because they gain access to opportunities they wouldn’t otherwise have.  They effectively leverage the effort, expertise, and relationships of the syndicator.

The syndicator wins because the passive investors’ capital facilitates economies of scale and access to bigger deals the syndicator might not have on his own.

And for both parties, two major sources of investable capital are paper assets in brokerage and retirement accounts, and equity in existing properties that can be re-positioned.

For example, real estate equity in an “appreciated” state might be accessed through a cash-out mortgage for about 5 percent interest at today’s rates.

The loan proceeds can be used to acquire property in an “emerging growth” state that cash-flows at maybe 10 percent cash-on-cash.

The property-owner gets a positive spread on the equity, picks up some valuable tax-breaks, and has additional “top-line” real estate income streams which can grow over time.  Same equity, but more future opportunity.

As for stock market equity …

If history is any indicator, the recent turmoil in the paper asset markets is likely to create even more interest in real estate.

That’s because speculating on asset prices, whether it’s stocks or crypto-currencies, is a lot of fun when they’re spiking.

But when the tide turns on speculation … and it always does … real estate’s reputation as a reliable wealth builder is once again revealed and appreciated.

In fact, the CoreLogic article affirms the stability of real estate:

“… since 1970 home-equity wealth has been one-third less variable than corporate equity values …” 

And another recently released report from The National Bureau of Economic Research, The Rate of Return of Everything, 1870-2015, says …

“… returns in housing markets tend to be smoother than those in stock markets …”

“… housing has been as a good a long-run investment as equities, and possibly better.”

“… equities do not outperform housing in simple risk-adjusted terms.”

 “Housing provides a higher return per unit of risk …” 

“… housing returns … are more stable … housing portfolios have had comparable real returns to … equity portfolios, but with only half the volatility.”

The report concludes (remember, to them, “equity” means stocks) …

“… the most surprising result of our study is that long term returns on housing and equity look remarkably similar.  Yet while returns are comparable, residential real estate is less volatile …” 

“Returns are comparable”, BUT… they didn’t include leverage …

“… the estimates … constitute only un-levered housing returns …”

When you add in 4:1 leverage (25 percent down), you take a 6 percent real estate equity growth rate to 24 percent!

Of course, we’re probably preaching to the choir.  But think about this …

Maybe YOU already know real estate is a powerful, predictable, and demonstrably more stable wealth-building vehicle than stocks over the long haul.

But paper asset investors have been riding an easy money wave up to record-levels … and now stock markets are starting to get REALLY jittery.

What once was a fun ride is now becoming scary.  And  if you’re a syndicator, this is MUSIC to your ears.

That’s because paper asset investors are probably looking at their brokerage accounts and retirement plans, and are growing much more open to getting involved in real estate when it’s presented properly.

And if you’re a Main Street real estate investor limited by only your own funds, maybe it’s time to consider leveraging your skills to get in on the syndication action.

We think syndication is arguably the best opportunity in real estate today.

We realize there are some people who think real estate might slow down because of rising interest rates. But history disagrees.

Rising rates just makes it hard for home buyers.  And when it’s harder to buy, more people rent for longer, which is good for landlords.

Look what happened when the mortgage markets imploded in 2008 …

… no one could get a mortgage, millions had to rent, and even though there was a financial crisis … rents went up and up and up.

So all this stock market volatility is actually a gift to real estate investors.

Until next time … good investing!


More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training, and resources to help real estate investors succeed.

Market Diversification for More Stable Income

One of the most important pieces of advice we give to investors new and old is “Live where you want to live, but invest where the numbers make sense.”

Once you break out of your market comfort zone, you can experience incredible personal and business growth … and build a diversified, stable portfolio.

In this episode, we discuss the various types of markets available to real estate investors … and chat about how to pick a market based on your personal goals.

Listen in! In this episode of The Real Estate Guys™ show you’ll hear from:

  • Your diversified host, Robert Helms
  • His divergent co-host, Russell Gray

Listen



Subscribe

Broadcasting since 1997 with over 300 episodes on iTunes!

real estate podcast on itunesSubscribe on Androidyoutube_subscribe_button__2014__by_just_browsiing-d7qkda4

 

 


Review

When you give us a positive review on iTunes you help us continue to bring you high caliber guests and attract new listeners. It’s easy and takes just a minute! (Don’t know how? Follow these instructions).

Thanks!


The two major market types

Let’s start from the top! Investment markets can be categorized into two major types … cash flow markets and equity growth markets.

Whether a market produces strong equity growth or stable rents is a byproduct of supply and demand.

Cash flow markets have a steady demand for rentals from working-class tenants with stable income. These factors combine to create high occupancy rates and reliable income.

These markets don’t sizzle … but they offer steady returns.

On the other side of the coin, markets like San Francisco and Los Angeles are proven, stable equity growth markets. Investors won’t get reliable cash flow in these markets … but if they get in before the market gets hot, they’ll get hefty equity growth.

You can predict the next equity growth markets by looking at markets where the ability to supply new housing is beginning to be restricted.

Buying a property for equity growth is a completely different style of investing than cash flow investing, and it comes with some challenges … like finding properties that make sense, choosing markets with a good probability of growth before they get too hot, and managing your income.

It requires caution … because if you choose the wrong market … or the right market at the wrong time … your investment can go against you.

Of course, these two major market types are two extremes. The reality is that markets fall onto a continuum … and yes, there are markets that combine equity growth and cash flow.

Some markets have the capacity to supply housing as they continue to grow in value. However, inevitably that market will begin to slow down and shift through the cycle.

There are some trade-offs to combining equity growth and cash flow … for example, cash flow isn’t quite as good as prices go up. To evaluate a current market, look at the trajectory of other major markets like New York or even Dallas.

Markets are cyclical, and almost every market evolves the same way. There are four basic stages in a market cycle:

  1. Growth. The market is expanding as more people are drawn to the area.
  2. Equilibrium. After a period of growth, the market slows down and is mostly developed.
  3. Decline. This can happen when a market falls out of favor or loses employers.
  4. Revitalization. The market starts to pick up again when demand increases.

The key? Study markets you want to invest in. Understand there is an evolution process, and even if a market is currently great for cash flow, it can absolutely evolve into an equity market in the future.

How to allocate your real estate assets

You’ve probably heard the saying, “Diversity is a recipe for mediocrity.” And while that rings true in some cases, we think diversity can be your key to a stable portfolio.

Investors can benefit by using a basic asset allocation recipe … and remember, these numbers are yours to fiddle with:

  • 50% of your portfolio should be allocated to solid cash flow markets.
  • 30% should be invested in aggressive equity growth markets that show signs of being in the path of progress, such as supply and demand imbalances.
  • And your remaining 20% should be liquidity funds … dry powder you can have on hand so you can swoop in and pick up great deals when everyone else is strapped.

Here’s a good question … how do investors approach aggressive growth markets?

To leverage an equity growth market, you need to invest while the market is still emerging.

That doesn’t mean investing in brand-new markets … it means looking for markets that are starting to take off with signs of job growth and increasing demand.

You want to avoid being spread too thin across markets … but you also want to be leery about banking on any one type of market. As the saying goes, “Don’t put all your eggs in one basket.”

There are, of course, some advantages to sticking with a single market, like efficiencies of scale. But if you stick to a single market and that market declines, your whole portfolio is affected.

Unique market types

Of course, every market has unique factors, but some markets stand out from the crowd in particularly distinctive ways.

  • The college market.

You can make a great income investing in housing near colleges and universities. It’s a captive market with constant need and a built-in client base … most students have good income durability.

You do have to consider the nature of technology, social trends, and educational trends when investing in a college market, however.

A great resource for information is the college or university itself … they can provide great data on the student population. If you’re careful, this can be a stable market.

  • The retirement market.

Jobs aren’t the only driver of strong markets, as retirement markets prove. Retirees today are more active and less likely to buy a house.

They can also make excellent tenants, especially because retirees are no longer geographically linked to their income, whether that’s social security, a pension, or investment returns.

By positioning yourself in markets like Boca Raton or Palm Springs, you can benefit from retirees who are searching for an affordable, attractive lifestyle that doesn’t tie up a bunch of capital.

  • The lifestyle market.

Making a lifestyle investment means picking a market YOU want to spend time in.

This often involves renting a property on a monthly, weekly, or even nightly basis … which translates to high income, even when offset by higher management costs.

A major benefit of a lifestyle market is the chance to use the property yourself, whether that’s for a few months every year or during your own retirement.

  • The international market.

Investing outside of your country is a great way to diversify. The United States is not the only country in the world that offers great places to invest.

Investing outside of the U.S. also gives you the chance to create income in a different currency and park your wealth in a different economic environment.

And international investments are a sort of lifestyle investment … they certainly give you a good excuse to travel!

Although international investments can often require a steep learning curve, they’re something every serious investor should take a look at.

There’s always a great-performing market if you know where to look.

  • The sleeper market.

Sleeper markets aren’t on the top 50 metropolitan statistical areas. These are boutique markets … the markets no one else is talking about.

They allow you to make returns no one else can make … but there isn’t as much ballast, so you have to be very, very careful.

Don’t forget to consider property type

We’ve discussed market types in this episode … but another important part of your investment decision is property types.

The choice of single-family, multi-family, commercial, development, or land-holding property is an important factor when balancing your portfolio of well.

And different markets hold different opportunities with regard to property type.

We want to get you thinking about where to look for your next investment … and market type is a great place to start!


More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training and resources to help real estate investors succeed.

Income inequality and you …

You’ve probably noticed the world becoming more polarized …  both politically and economically.  

The growing disparity between the rich and middle-class is obvious.  But that gap doesn’t divide neatly across political lines the way it used to. 

So let’s forget politics and just see what we can learn … and do … to close our own wealth gap. 

This Bloomberg article captured our attention this week … 

The U.S. is Where the Rich are the Richest – Things are looking rosy for billionaires and millionaires as wealth accumulation goes into overdrive

Even as economic growth has slowed, the rich have managed to gain a larger slice of the world’s wealth.” 

 “… the rich have been taking ever-larger shares of wealth and income …” 

 “The tide shifted in the 1980s under Republican President Ronald Reagan …” 

Oops. There’s that pesky political dividing line. 

For Reagan worshippers, this is sacrilege and anything else this guy says is heresy.  For Reagan haters, this is music to their ears and everything this guy says is gospel. 

So don’t tune out just because you love or hate Reagan.  That’s not the point. 

Let’s see if we can figure out why wealth accumulation is in overdrive for some folks … and how we can make some of it happen for us. 

There are clues in the article … 

Globally, about half of new wealth comes from existing financial assets – rising stock prices or yields on bonds and bank deposits  – held predominantly by the already well off.” 

In plain English, that’s balance sheet wealth …  Assets going up in price and/or throwing off cash-flow. 

Note to self:  Acquire assets. 

The rest of the world’s new wealth comes from what BCG calls ‘new wealth creation’, from people saving money they’ve earned through labor or entrepreneurship.” 

(BCG is Boston Consulting Group.  The 38-page report which the article is based on is here.) 

So BCG is making a distinction between balance sheet wealth (wealth creating wealth) and actually earning through being productive (work creating wealth). 

Those are two very different paths to wealth.  Of course, investing is about wealth creating wealth.  But we’d argue REAL wealth is only created through productivity.  

This poses a challenge for investors. 

But before we go there, let’s revisit the Bloomberg author’s premise that inequality was birthed as a result of political policies in the 1980’s. 

This isn’t to defend or criticize Reagan … but to see why and how the game changed … and how it affects the way we play it today. 

In the 60’s, the U.S. overspent on wars and welfare.  We’ll forego judgment on whether those were wise or necessary.  It happened. 

Going broke, Uncle Sam reprised a softer version of the gold confiscation scheme from the 30’s … and effectively took all the silver out of the financial system. 

In 1964, they took the silver out of the coins and removed the silver backing from the currency.  

In fact, many people investing today have never even seen paper money that’s backed by real money

In 1971, Uncle Sam defaulted on the Bretton-Woods promise to back the dollar with gold … by closing the gold window “temporarily”.  The world is still waiting. 

So now, the dollar was no longer accountable to silver or gold.  Uncle Sam could print as many dollars as he wanted. 

Soon after, the dollar collapsed, and inflation soared along with the price of gold.  

So Uncle Sam cut deals with Saudi Arabia and China to create demand for dollars by linking it to oil … and to import cheap labor via job exports to China. 

In the 70’s, the existential crisis du jour was the world running completely dry of oil by 2000.  Not sure what happened to that.  Seems like there’s plenty of oil today. 

But it did provide a plausible explanation for the dollar losing value against gasoline … something every voter experienced at the pump.  

Plus, the higher oil prices increased how many excess dollars were soaked up into the oil trade. Probably just a coincidence. 

But all of this wasn’t enough to prop up the dollar. So Fed chair Paul Volker jacked interest rates up to nose-bleed levels. 

It nearly crushed the economy, but it reset the dollar, which has been on a more controlled descent ever since. 

It was painful. 

For real estate investors, crazy high interest rates kicked off the golden age of creative financing.  People always get smarter during hard times. 

In 1987, Alan Greenspan took the helm of the Fed and ushered in a new age of “prosperity” driven by ever-increasing asset prices. 

And if, God forbid, asset prices should fall … markets could count on the Maestro to drop rates, print money, and reflate asset prices at all costs.  

So the Greenspan “put” was born … as was the “financialization” of the economy.  And both Ben Bernanke and Janet Yellen have kept the party going. 

When markets are only permitted to go up, and any downturn is immediately met with huge volumes of cheap money to reflate them, it’s easier to make money with money than to do real work.

And that changes the composition of the economy YOU are investing in. 

Take a look at this graphic … 

Notice the U.S. share of growth from “new wealth” (productivity) is second smallest behind Japan.   While “existing assets” (investing) is 70% of the growth. 

Which kind of growth creates jobs for your tenants? 

Also, notice that Asia has the HIGHEST share of “new wealth” creation.  Not a shocker.  That’s where all the manufacturing (and jobs) went. 

So what’s an investor to do with all this? 

First, don’t be fooled by balance sheet wealth.  Even though we LOVE equity, it can be fickle.  

If central banks lose their ability to reflate … or make moves (like raising interest rates and shrinking balance sheets) that constrict credit… equity can disappear fast. 

So if you have some excess equity on your balance sheet, you might think about moving it someplace safe.  Otherwise, the market might take it before you can. 

Next, remember that productivity (cash flow) is what creates real wealth.  So be sure to index your wealth to real productivity. 

Focus on accumulating the efforts of others through rents, interest, and labor.  

That is, become a landlord, lender and business owner. 

Because just buying low and selling high only accumulates currency … which remains on a slippery slope of long term decline. 

And simply holding non-cash-flowing assets on your balance sheet, hoping to see them go “up”, might make you FEEL rich as you admire your net worth …  

But, as many discovered in 2008, when the air comes out, the only wealth that’s real is cash flow (productivity).  

So the key to real equity isn’t from rising prices, but from increasing cash flows.  

Until next time … good investing! 


 More From The Real Estate Guys™…

The Real Estate Guys™ radio show and podcast provides real estate investing news, education, training and resources to help real estate investors succeed.

Next Page »